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Sweetpeabike
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PostPosted: 18:21 - 11 Oct 2017    Post subject: Any tips or advice for a new rider? Reply with quote

Hey everyone. I am new to riding and recently purchased a CBF 125 and slowing expanding out of my local area of Romsey.

I was wondering if anyone could give me some essential tips on general riding, and on traveling during heavy traffic as I have not started to filter yet? Should I place myself in a central position on the road or more to the left or right of a car while queuing/standstill?

Thanks.

Holly
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Howling Terror
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PostPosted: 18:35 - 11 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

Position for safety and position for the best view works in all situations.

As for slow riding, practice it. Try the different methods i.e clutch slipping, or drag a little rear brake. I use the rear brake quite a bit when taking a pillion or loaded up..keeps the bike stable and useful when coming to a stop at junctions.

Don't be in a rush to filter until you can ride slow and smooth and when you do filter keep your senses working and no need to rush.......yet. Wink
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Sweetpeabike
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PostPosted: 19:48 - 11 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have been working on clutch control and slow moments lately so hopefully I'll see a improvement soon, thank you for the advice Smile
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pinkyfloyd
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PostPosted: 21:31 - 11 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with HT.

Take your time to get to know your bike. Position yourself to be seen and so you can see On the CBT you are taught middle of the lane at all times, sometimes this is not practical. Especially in heavy traffic
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Tracer1234
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PostPosted: 22:28 - 11 Oct 2017    Post subject: Re: Any tips or advice for a new rider? Reply with quote

Sweetpeabike wrote:
Hey everyone. I am new to riding and recently purchased a CBF 125 and slowing expanding out of my local area of Romsey.

I was wondering if anyone could give me some essential tips on general riding, and on traveling during heavy traffic as I have not started to filter yet? Should I place myself in a central position on the road or more to the left or right of a car while queuing/standstill?

Thanks.

Holly


Hello and Welcome.

We are right to assume you have done your CBT?

Smile
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M.C
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PostPosted: 22:29 - 11 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

With vans stop so you're visible in their mirrors (found that out the hard way). With filtering take your time and don't try to copy/follow other bikers.
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Ericck
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PostPosted: 22:34 - 11 Oct 2017    Post subject: Any tips or advice for a new rider? Reply with quote

Filtering can be quite intense as you need to have your wits about you to observe what everyone around you is doing or likely to do.

As said don't be in a rush to start filtering but when you do start to filter, maybe do it in stages. Filter a bit then when you see an appropriate gap, tuck back into the traffic and rest. Then if you feel comfortable filter a bit more.

If another bike comes up behind you don't try to filter faster, find a an appropriate space, pull in and let them pass.

There are many pitfalls to filtering, the most likely being someone changing lanes without looking. Stationary traffic is easier as there are fewer gaps. In moving traffic be careful where there is room for another vehicle to change lanes.

Remember to always expect the unexpected Smile
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stinkwheel
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PostPosted: 22:46 - 11 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

Keep your head up, grip loose and look at where you want to go, not at what you want to avoid.
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Howling Terror
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PostPosted: 23:09 - 11 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh forgot to say hello and welcome.


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I like puppies. Drooling
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Tracer1234
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PostPosted: 23:35 - 11 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh and be sure to get involved in the Picture Challenge. We need more people involved...
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trevor saxe-coburg-gotha
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PostPosted: 06:43 - 12 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

Be smooth - in every part of your riding, always.

Here's something I read in one bike mag or the other recently - think of your vision like it's a headlight. Most drivers (and riders?) proceed on main beam - their vision locates a lot of relevant info. But if you "see" on full beam the area(s) you're taking information from is significantly wider, and further ahead.

As said above, this means keeping your head up. You do literally have to "lift" your vision.

Also as you get better, you need to 'read the road' - this includes taking/processing information from each and every signpost and roadmarking as early as possible, but also taking cues from other features such as where the road may turn with tree and hedge lines etc.

On bends be sure to keep your vision focused on the vanishing point, not the sides of the road. Google for more on that.

As for town work and urban shit, one daft but useful mnemonic is "slow to flow". What that means is you will often make more or as much progress if you're planning ahead. Where is the next set of lights or pedestrian crossing - where in the light-cycle are the traffic lights and where are they likely to be when you get there, and can you actually slow down in order to glide through them with stopping as a result of the extra forward planning you've done. Etc. etc.

You need to get into all that kind of shit before you can become adroit at filtering. You must also be very careful when filtering passed any junction. A left hand junction because the large vehicle in front that's going really slowly might have just flashed someone out, who you're going to collide with. A right hand junction because the driver approaching is only going to look right, but you're coming from the left, and quite possibly on their side of the road. Also, if there's a long line of stationary traffic you're filtering down, be careful of vehicles in front peeling off to u-turn cos they're sick of waiting and are going to drive around looking for rat runs. They won;t signal out nor will they mirror or shoulder check.

Bike boxes at the front of lights are 3 points if you're on a motorbike - but how many bikers per year get done for it is unknown and thought by most to be very few. Personally I tend not to use them but there's no doubting their usefulness to ensure you can be seen and are out of the more vulnerable position at the edge of the lane. Maybe the unwritten rule should be to use them if there are no cyclists in there, or just one or two.

Good practice to stop on the rear brake. In the wet - by which is meant especially the not very wet, just a thin coating of slimy rain - always stop this way, i.e. the last few feet of control. Halting on the front brake can all too easily result in a little break of traction if there's grit or in town some old residue of oil, fuel etc. Which in the wet is slippery as fuck.
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Rogerborg
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PostPosted: 08:00 - 12 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

The first issue with filtering is determing when it will actually benefit you.

The limiting factor on my commute is lights, not traffic.

If you filter to the front at a set of lights, zip away, and all it buys you is a longer wait at the next set then you've swapped risk for no reward.

Except for the lulz. And the lulz are enough.
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barrkel
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PostPosted: 15:55 - 12 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rogerborg wrote:
The first issue with filtering is determing when it will actually benefit you.

It will definitely benefit you if you're e.g. on a multi-lane dual carriageway or motorway at rush hour. Benefits much more marginal in 30 limits, but if the cars are doing 20 (and half the roads are turning 20 these days), you get ahead (i.e. stop at one fewer reds) maybe 1 light in 3.

Adjust speed and position to balance vision, visibility, hazards and braking. Hazards are things you need to brake for, or expect you might need to brake for (gaps between cars, pedestrians, cyclists etc. coming out between cars, etc.). Position so that should the unexpected happen you can see it happening sooner, and have more time to react (avoid or brake) when (not if) it does. Usually that means maximizing vision; but sometimes (e.g. a car peeping out of a junction on the left hand side of right-hand bend), you move to the right edge of the lane and sacrifice vision around the bend to give more space to avoid the hazard (and increase visibility to the peeper), and you then sacrifice speed because you have less vision.

Be gentle on the throttle pulling out of junctions on wet days. I've dropped two different bikes doing that.

Always be aware of the risk of people doing unusual things on routes you regularly ride. You get used to particular junctions never being used, junctions you forget exist. One day you'll be shocked when a car suddenly turns down one, or pops out.

Also be wary of vehicles moving slower than the should be. They're usually lost or on the phone, and are liable to make dramatic direction swings with no observation or notice; or they're slowing for a junction you haven't considered.
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Andy_Pagin
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PostPosted: 11:20 - 13 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

There's no law that says you have to filter, so only do it when you're confident. Personally I only filter when traffic comes to a dead stop. Being in London of course this is most of the time.
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Sweetpeabike
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PostPosted: 00:49 - 05 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for all your helpful replies! I am aware there has been a delay in my acknowledgement and since I have posted this question my riding has only improved and I have finally started to filter, very pleased. But still more to improve on! Again thank you and sorry for the delay!
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struan80
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PostPosted: 02:04 - 05 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don't listen to those halfwits. Brakes only slow you down and you can do the speed limit everywhere including at 90 deg bends on a 60 zone. There is no limit to how fast you can slow down, a stoppy is recommended for maximum affects at the traffic lights. The 'polis' can't do a thing.

Wheel spins whilst accelerating are doing people a favor as it shows them the correct line on the road, A bit like Grand Tourismo.
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Polarbear
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PostPosted: 03:12 - 05 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

^^^ Of course ^^^ Laughing

Seriously

It's like anything you learn. The more you do it the better you become.

If you are confident filtering thats fine and I suspect in your area it's pretty much a necessity at times.

Filtering is something you have to have the confidence to do and the anticipation to see idiots doing idiotic things for no fucking reason. If it can go wrong, someone will do it.

I have ridden for 40 years and the only place I am happy filtering while traffic is on the move is on a motorway (which I have done on a Goldwing amongst others so it's nothing to do with bike size!) I'll only filter past stationary traffic on normal roads but then I don't live in a city and don't use a bike for commuting.

Perhaps I need a POLITE vest to become a good filterer Cool

So enjoy, look ahead and anticipate the unanticipatable. Don't let cars and big stuff bully you into the gutter and enjoy. Thumbs Up
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ADSrox0r
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PostPosted: 10:07 - 05 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

Filtering tends to be more natural if you've spent plenty of time on a pushbike in city traffic. You're used to being aggressive/defensive with your positioning and taking opportunities.

It's already been said in half a dozen ways but I'll say it again just so I feel all internet-important for joining in; filtering is only worth it if it actually gains you something. Quite often you'll find that passing a couple of cars didn't shorten your journey by anything appreciable. On the other hand, being able to move down a line of stationary traffic to the front can shave minutes off your commute.

You need to be very spatially aware, both of your own size and extremities and of the situation around you as it develops. Filtering is inherently a dangerous situation because car drivers will not be expecting you to appear in a gap they're about to make a snap decision to nudge into.

Once you're comfortable with it though, it's a natural thing to do and generally accepted as our prerogative.
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linuxyeti
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PostPosted: 10:36 - 05 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

ADSrox0r wrote:
.... On the other hand, being able to move down a line of stationary traffic to the front can shave minutes off your commute.


I agree with all that's been said, but, beware if it's stationary, and has been for a while, beware of drivers opening their doors to get out and stretch their legs !! And if it's slow moving traffic, and a gap apperars in one lane of the slow moving traffic, be prepared for a car to impulsively switch lanes to grab the spot. Also in slowmoving, or stationary traffic, keep an eye out for pedestrians making a dash for it across the road! Fortunately over time, you learn to spot these, and other potential hazards whilst filtering.
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Teflon-Mike
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PostPosted: 03:23 - 06 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

L-Plate is for 'Learner'.. use it as intended to go learn how to pass tests.

Tests do not require you 'filter'.

Filtering is actually 'over-taking'.. something you do pretty much at risk... as learner aren't you facing enough risk, without looking for even more?

If you are confident and competent enough to filter, more filter in peak commuter traffic, more still in the most hazard strewn environment of 'urban traffic.... THEN you should be confident and competent enough to pass tests.. so go take them.. if not.. why not?

Failing test tends to be far less hurt, pain, hassle and cost than dragging a 125 out from under a SMIDSY's bumper, when you have bruised ribs and torn wet weathers.. believe me!

When you have a full licence, however you choose to obtain it, THEN, you may, if you wish, like to consider filtering.... till then t's unnecessary, and simply ramping the risk for little or no reward.

If you want a licence you must do Motorcycle Theory/Hazard test, whatever test route your choose. May as well, get that booked, get some practice, get it nailed, soon as. Far more worth-while than worrying about any other individual exercise of other tests. It's £24 that has to be spent one way or another.

A1 tests can be done on the 125 you already have, taxed, insured & MOT'd, for relative peanuts; Mod 1 is £15,50, Mod 2, £75; that's under a hundred quid for what's essentially a once and forever, 'life-time' CBT, you don't have to hang L-Plates on.

Pass that, and you don't have to 'guess' whether you have confidence or competence, its proven. And you don't have to do anything else, unless you want to. You can carry on riding 125's indefinitely.

If you want higher licence for bigger bike, you just have to do it over on a bigger bike; with that confidence & competence you have passed it once, and know what to expect on tests.

To my mind, that £130 odd buys you a heck of a lot if biking, and confidence, all told.

THAT is top tip; use 125 & CBT as intended for learning to pass tests, not dodge them.

Heavy traffic? Yeah.. no one makes you ride a motorbike; YOU can pick where and hen you ride, and heavy traffic, city snarl IS the most hazardous. you don't 'have' to tackle it!

Lane positioning? Keep it out the gutter! Other than that? Just use them eyes n the back-of your head! The place for parade-ground-precision is the parade ground! On the mean streets, you do what works! Keep your eyes open and use your wits!

Remember, if you cant see the eyes of another driver, directly or in a mirror THEY wont have a chance to see you, even if they look! So position for SIGHT.. both other drivers and road-hazards... which is everything from bad banding to the scaffold bracket that falls off the back of the builders wagon! So give yourself room, to see and to react, and position for sight, and reaction room.. and do what works...

The 'prescribed' rules for following a lane have shifted from 1/3 from the kurb to 1/3 from the median, to middle of lane, and back-again, at least twice in my riding career, and if thems that make up the rules cant make up their minds, you sure as heck haven' got a shot!! DO WOT WORKS; use you eyes, use wits! On test, criteria is to show a 'safe' confident and legal ride, NOT be a BMF poster-child! So long as you aren't wobbling all over the place, or sticking it somewhere daft the whole while, it's at worst a minor; causing hazard, making anyone else brake or swerve or just change speed, is a major!

So don't sweat the small stuff... worry about the stuff that matters.... and top of the list as a learner, is getting the licence, that says you aren't an absolute learner!
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M.C
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PostPosted: 15:15 - 06 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

ADSrox0r wrote:
Filtering tends to be more natural if you've spent plenty of time on a pushbike in city traffic.

I wish my cycling filtering skills would translate to the motorbike (even though I nearly got taken out the other day (we'll gloss over that)) Neutral I find it massively easier on a bicycle, and I make much better progress as well Embarassed I think it's being able to stand up in the pedals, move at very slow speed and even stand stationary (for a few seconds) with your feet off the ground. Not tried any of that on a big bike... I'm pretty sure you'd fall over Smile
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Sweetpeabike
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PostPosted: 14:43 - 15 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

Teflon-Mike wrote:
L-Plate is for 'Learner'.. use it as intended to go learn how to pass tests.



I took my theory test before I took my CBT in July last year and I am wanting to take my DAS in May. I am aware that filtering is not technically on the MOD1/2, but in central Southampton I filter past traffic when safe and I have not attempted any other forms of filtering yet. I was born and raised in Southampton and plan my route in advance from my home and back again (always have a plan B). I spend about 3 hours on the bike exploring different routes and depending on how I feel I take a different route home to increase my confidence and ability e.g large motorway roundabouts or faster small roundabout which are nasty!

But I do this to prove to myself that I won't just past my test, but I'll smash it, knowing I've tackled some of the shittest times and roads in Southampton. Plus adventuring into the New Forest and towards Winchester. Plus, I am always wanting to gain knowledge and advice from experienced bikers and ride only with safe riders.

So everyones post on here is valuable regarding filtering and I know
that I need/want to improve on certain areas before I book my test. But thank you for your response and I do try to ride safe and sensible so that I do not develop bad habits - I'd consider myself pretty safe.
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Teflon-Mike
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PostPosted: 16:28 - 15 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tests are pass or fail. There's no grades of pass, just a pass. Like I say you don't have to be a BMF poster-child, just show a safe, legal, confident ride.

The habit of filtering, before tests, isn't a peculiar good one...

The 'idea' behind filtering is to keep moving; this provides notion that if moving you are making progress, and some-how getting somewhere a little bit faster.

Your Part 2 test, is approx 45minutes, from start to finish; in there there's about 15 minutes of paperwork & Q&A, so barely half hour of on road time...

If you are sat in a queue of stationary traffic, safety position adopted, no false signals being shown; there's bog all you can do 'wrong' as far as giving the examiner opportunity to tick a FAIL box on his checklist... is there?

If on the other hand, you chose to filter; yo offer MANY opportunists for the examiner to tick a fail box, just in that maneuver... more still, IF the filtering 'works' and actually saves time... test is still 30 minutes long, so you just have to fill that saved time, with more riding, and still more opportunity for examiner to check the fail box!

So what do you gain for it?

On test you have to demonstrate 'confidence'; you DON'T have to do that by filtering.

On test you have to demonstrate 'making progress'; you DON'T have to do that by filtering.

On test you have to demonstrate 'passing & over-taking'; you DON'T have to do that by filtering.

SO, don't get in the habit of dong something you DON'T have to do, on test, that wont help you pass test, but gives so much increased opportunity for you to both fail test, or get hurt!

In the real-world post test... filtering, still remains a questionable practice. Others have advocated it, and some even insist it's 'essential' which I cannot for a moment support.

Personally, I do filter, and I am told, rather aggressively.. a few ex London Dispatchers. usually considered a few bricks short of a load on the topic, have even remarked that I'm a little 'mad' in how aggressively I may filter..... and I probably am!! In my defense its probably a legacy of coming from school-boy trials, where putting a foot-down incurred penalty points, and loss of forward motion a 'maximum' 5.... so Its an old habit, that's never died! But still....

In the real-world, on a bike capable of well over twice the speed you can legally go on this country's roads; my time from coffee cup to coffee cup, between home and work was around 40 minutes. Seriously illegal speeds on the by-pass, exploiting the bikes blistering mid-range and instant, on demand, 'roll-on' acceleration, to punch holes in traffic on A-Roads, and accomplish over-takes. in gaps other vehicles couldn't even conceive of, and then aggressively filter for 20 minutes through Birmingham city snarl..... the sum total of all that effort, MIGHT have saved me enough time to watch the kettle boil, before I sat down! Maybe 3 minutes! Seriously!?! Is t worth it? Better just leaving 3 minutes earlier!

Has to be said, that of the travel choices I had, the bike, with added time either end to tog up and togging off, and more hidden time on the week-end, tensioning the chain and changing the oil, probably didn't save me any real time what-so ever, over taking the car, half asleep like every-one else, and staying warm and dry and listening to the radio news!

So, it has to be said, that as a practice, "filtering" more often is a placebo, that may deflect some steering wheel gnashing frustration, but in all likelihood, does little or nothing for shortening actual journey time, and even f it does, the risks for that small reward are huge.

I will say, that on a road-works strewn motorway or by-pass on a bank-holiday, slightly less 'aggressive' filtering, and watching the snarl part for you like the red sea before Moses, can be an absolute (if rare!) joy...

BUT, it still remains a practice you DO NOT have to engage in, even after test, and if you do, probably has more psychological merit than actual.

Given the risks? Given the risks in commuter snarl, and give the even greater risks during winter, when bikes are an even less familiar site on our roads, and brain-dead drivers even less alert than usual for bikes, and if you haven't passed tests yet, there is EVERY reason, just to NOT get in the habit.

Its not going to save you much, if any time, on a 125l Its not going to help you pass tests, ALL i does is offer eve more opportunity to effup and suffer pain.

As said, I do it, and practically abut the 'only' viable justification I can give for it being 'useful' is that, every time you stop and plant feet, is a double chance to come a croppa. Don't stop, you dodge that opportunity... but filtering twixt cars, you offer so many more, from cars throwing doors open, changing lane, doing U-turns or cutting the queue. What's the greater risk? What has greater severity? And STILL do you need to 'filter' in order to keep moving?

Its your call, but think long and hard about the risk vs rewards.

Meanwhile, IF you plan DAS anyway, why have't you done it?

What more do you expect to gain from going it alone on a tiddler? You cant teah yourslf things you don't already know; all you can do is make mstakes, you may learn from. They tend to hurt.

If you are going to get formal training, surely better to get that ASAP and get some know how you could practice on your 125, if you don't do tests straight away, but either way get the benefit from straght away...

Rather than looking for bad habits and trouble, caused by such things as 'filtering' to get into?

It's January; Christmas credit-card bills are due shortly; schools are usually struggling to fill appointment books; most 'offers' are available on courses, and while the sun's not shining and the Marsh hare's are still in hibernation, most test appointments 'open' and test waits shortest.

Weather? Suggestion s you are riding in it ANYWAY.. so what the heck! Use it to your advantage! And turning up in the wet and mucky appropriately dressed in slime smeared over-suit will show more enthusiasm and determination to an examiner, and win you more brownie points, whilst weather will also give you lea-room for being a bit more cautouse, and detur examiner for expecting so much of you.... roads are also well washed this time of year; you don't get so much rain-lifted slime on the surface, so whilst cold grip tends to be pretty good.

All up; you stand as much chance of 'Smashing it' if that is really important to you, now, as you ever will. So why dally, and why fret about stuff, that really isn't going to help much towards that aspiration, if any?

If you are based in Southmpton, that's only a sip believe from Gosport where out Pinky, is a DAS instructor... save you some searching, here: http://www.kickstartridertraining.co.uk/.. PM hm, drop him a e-mail; see what he suggests, whether he can put you on one of thier courses, offer ad-hoc lessons to suit, or reccomend some-one closer/more convenient; THAT would get you far further ahead, than fretting about filtering. Its somethng you do need to do at some point. Filterng, just isn't.
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Rogerborg
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Joined: 26 Oct 2010
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PostPosted: 16:28 - 15 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sweetpeabike wrote:
I am always wanting to gain knowledge and advice from experienced bikers and ride only with safe riders.

That's a broad brush.

If you ever feel that a riding companion is displaying some form of superpower that lets them see through hedges and hill crests, back off and let them get on with it. It's more likely that they're replaying their last clear, dry ride on that road than that they actually have x-ray vision.
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GONE: HN125-8, LF-250B, GPz 305, GPZ 500S, Burgman 400 // RIDING: F650GS (800 twin), Royal Enfield Bullet Electra 500 AVL, Ninja 250R because racebike
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M.C
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Joined: 29 Sep 2015
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PostPosted: 17:08 - 15 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sweetpeabike resize that avatar Tut Tut

- No wider than 80 pixels
- No taller than 100 pixels

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