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Any tips or advice for a new rider?

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Sweetpeabike
L Plate Warrior



Joined: 11 Oct 2017
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PostPosted: 17:21 - 11 Oct 2017    Post subject: Any tips or advice for a new rider? Reply with quote

Hey everyone. I am new to riding and recently purchased a CBF 125 and slowing expanding out of my local area of Romsey.

I was wondering if anyone could give me some essential tips on general riding, and on traveling during heavy traffic as I have not started to filter yet? Should I place myself in a central position on the road or more to the left or right of a car while queuing/standstill?

Thanks.

Holly
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Howling Terror
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PostPosted: 17:35 - 11 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

Position for safety and position for the best view works in all situations.

As for slow riding, practice it. Try the different methods i.e clutch slipping, or drag a little rear brake. I use the rear brake quite a bit when taking a pillion or loaded up..keeps the bike stable and useful when coming to a stop at junctions.

Don't be in a rush to filter until you can ride slow and smooth and when you do filter keep your senses working and no need to rush.......yet. Wink
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Sweetpeabike
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PostPosted: 18:48 - 11 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have been working on clutch control and slow moments lately so hopefully I'll see a improvement soon, thank you for the advice Smile
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pinkyfloyd
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PostPosted: 20:31 - 11 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with HT.

Take your time to get to know your bike. Position yourself to be seen and so you can see On the CBT you are taught middle of the lane at all times, sometimes this is not practical. Especially in heavy traffic
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Tracer1234
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Joined: 13 Sep 2014
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PostPosted: 21:28 - 11 Oct 2017    Post subject: Re: Any tips or advice for a new rider? Reply with quote

Sweetpeabike wrote:
Hey everyone. I am new to riding and recently purchased a CBF 125 and slowing expanding out of my local area of Romsey.

I was wondering if anyone could give me some essential tips on general riding, and on traveling during heavy traffic as I have not started to filter yet? Should I place myself in a central position on the road or more to the left or right of a car while queuing/standstill?

Thanks.

Holly


Hello and Welcome.

We are right to assume you have done your CBT?

Smile
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Riding: Yamaha MT-09 Tracer Occasionally Riding: 08 Suzuki SV650, Potato: 2011 Yamaha YBR Custom.
Used to ride: 2015 Yamaha MT-09 Tracer (smidsy) 09 Triumph Street Triple (P/X'd) 08 Yamaha YBR (Sold)
CBT 04/14. A: Mod 1 & 2 13/04/15
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M.C
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Joined: 29 Sep 2015
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PostPosted: 21:29 - 11 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

With vans stop so you're visible in their mirrors (found that out the hard way). With filtering take your time and don't try to copy/follow other bikers.
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Ericck
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Joined: 21 Jul 2011
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PostPosted: 21:34 - 11 Oct 2017    Post subject: Any tips or advice for a new rider? Reply with quote

Filtering can be quite intense as you need to have your wits about you to observe what everyone around you is doing or likely to do.

As said don't be in a rush to start filtering but when you do start to filter, maybe do it in stages. Filter a bit then when you see an appropriate gap, tuck back into the traffic and rest. Then if you feel comfortable filter a bit more.

If another bike comes up behind you don't try to filter faster, find a an appropriate space, pull in and let them pass.

There are many pitfalls to filtering, the most likely being someone changing lanes without looking. Stationary traffic is easier as there are fewer gaps. In moving traffic be careful where there is room for another vehicle to change lanes.

Remember to always expect the unexpected Smile
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Current Bikes: 2006 Suzuki Bandit 1200, 2008 Suzuki SV650N.
Previous Bikes: Yamaha FS1E, Mobylette Moped Thingy, Suzuki GS125, Kawasaki Zephyr 550, Kawasaki Zephyr 750, Kawasaki ER500, Suzuki Bandit 600, Honda CBR600F, Triumph Street Triple 675, Suzuki V Strom 650.
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stinkwheel
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Joined: 12 Jul 2004
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PostPosted: 21:46 - 11 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

Keep your head up, grip loose and look at where you want to go, not at what you want to avoid.
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Howling Terror
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PostPosted: 22:09 - 11 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh forgot to say hello and welcome.


Do you like puppies?
I like puppies. Drooling
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Tracer1234
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Joined: 13 Sep 2014
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PostPosted: 22:35 - 11 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh and be sure to get involved in the Picture Challenge. We need more people involved...
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Riding: Yamaha MT-09 Tracer Occasionally Riding: 08 Suzuki SV650, Potato: 2011 Yamaha YBR Custom.
Used to ride: 2015 Yamaha MT-09 Tracer (smidsy) 09 Triumph Street Triple (P/X'd) 08 Yamaha YBR (Sold)
CBT 04/14. A: Mod 1 & 2 13/04/15
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trevor saxe-coburg-gotha
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PostPosted: 05:43 - 12 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

Be smooth - in every part of your riding, always.

Here's something I read in one bike mag or the other recently - think of your vision like it's a headlight. Most drivers (and riders?) proceed on main beam - their vision locates a lot of relevant info. But if you "see" on full beam the area(s) you're taking information from is significantly wider, and further ahead.

As said above, this means keeping your head up. You do literally have to "lift" your vision.

Also as you get better, you need to 'read the road' - this includes taking/processing information from each and every signpost and roadmarking as early as possible, but also taking cues from other features such as where the road may turn with tree and hedge lines etc.

On bends be sure to keep your vision focused on the vanishing point, not the sides of the road. Google for more on that.

As for town work and urban shit, one daft but useful mnemonic is "slow to flow". What that means is you will often make more or as much progress if you're planning ahead. Where is the next set of lights or pedestrian crossing - where in the light-cycle are the traffic lights and where are they likely to be when you get there, and can you actually slow down in order to glide through them with stopping as a result of the extra forward planning you've done. Etc. etc.

You need to get into all that kind of shit before you can become adroit at filtering. You must also be very careful when filtering passed any junction. A left hand junction because the large vehicle in front that's going really slowly might have just flashed someone out, who you're going to collide with. A right hand junction because the driver approaching is only going to look right, but you're coming from the left, and quite possibly on their side of the road. Also, if there's a long line of stationary traffic you're filtering down, be careful of vehicles in front peeling off to u-turn cos they're sick of waiting and are going to drive around looking for rat runs. They won;t signal out nor will they mirror or shoulder check.

Bike boxes at the front of lights are 3 points if you're on a motorbike - but how many bikers per year get done for it is unknown and thought by most to be very few. Personally I tend not to use them but there's no doubting their usefulness to ensure you can be seen and are out of the more vulnerable position at the edge of the lane. Maybe the unwritten rule should be to use them if there are no cyclists in there, or just one or two.

Good practice to stop on the rear brake. In the wet - by which is meant especially the not very wet, just a thin coating of slimy rain - always stop this way, i.e. the last few feet of control. Halting on the front brake can all too easily result in a little break of traction if there's grit or in town some old residue of oil, fuel etc. Which in the wet is slippery as fuck.
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Rogerborg
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Joined: 26 Oct 2010
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PostPosted: 07:00 - 12 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

The first issue with filtering is determing when it will actually benefit you.

The limiting factor on my commute is lights, not traffic.

If you filter to the front at a set of lights, zip away, and all it buys you is a longer wait at the next set then you've swapped risk for no reward.

Except for the lulz. And the lulz are enough.
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barrkel
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PostPosted: 14:55 - 12 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rogerborg wrote:
The first issue with filtering is determing when it will actually benefit you.

It will definitely benefit you if you're e.g. on a multi-lane dual carriageway or motorway at rush hour. Benefits much more marginal in 30 limits, but if the cars are doing 20 (and half the roads are turning 20 these days), you get ahead (i.e. stop at one fewer reds) maybe 1 light in 3.

Adjust speed and position to balance vision, visibility, hazards and braking. Hazards are things you need to brake for, or expect you might need to brake for (gaps between cars, pedestrians, cyclists etc. coming out between cars, etc.). Position so that should the unexpected happen you can see it happening sooner, and have more time to react (avoid or brake) when (not if) it does. Usually that means maximizing vision; but sometimes (e.g. a car peeping out of a junction on the left hand side of right-hand bend), you move to the right edge of the lane and sacrifice vision around the bend to give more space to avoid the hazard (and increase visibility to the peeper), and you then sacrifice speed because you have less vision.

Be gentle on the throttle pulling out of junctions on wet days. I've dropped two different bikes doing that.

Always be aware of the risk of people doing unusual things on routes you regularly ride. You get used to particular junctions never being used, junctions you forget exist. One day you'll be shocked when a car suddenly turns down one, or pops out.

Also be wary of vehicles moving slower than the should be. They're usually lost or on the phone, and are liable to make dramatic direction swings with no observation or notice; or they're slowing for a junction you haven't considered.
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Andy_Pagin
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PostPosted: 10:20 - 13 Oct 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

There's no law that says you have to filter, so only do it when you're confident. Personally I only filter when traffic comes to a dead stop. Being in London of course this is most of the time.
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