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Fitting a chain guard to Honda CG 125 06 model?

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bellx1
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PostPosted: 22:26 - 08 Jan 2018    Post subject: Fitting a chain guard to Honda CG 125 06 model? Reply with quote

Hi, I'm planning a trip from the UK to Japan on my Honda cg 125 06 plate and have been thinking that it would be a good idea to fit a chain guard, like the older models have, to make my chain last longer.

So I was wondering if this is possible and if anyone else has done it before? Or is fitting a chain guard not really necessary?
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jaffa90
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PostPosted: 22:45 - 08 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good idea, looks like the 2006 deluxe has one.
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bellx1
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PostPosted: 22:52 - 08 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice, I wish my bike looked that snazzy haha. Maybe it will be quite straight forward then.
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Teflon-Mike
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PostPosted: 08:08 - 09 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

UK to Japan? Me Thinks how long the chain might last is probably the least of your worries!!!

Shaft-Drive-Itus.. or out-of-sight-out-of-mind. It's a myth that shaft drives are maintenance free; they are 'low' maintenance compared to a chain, but low maintenance is not NO maintenance. Its a bug-bear of the old GG when it was a current model they would frequently get run to the point the chain was so slack it was knocking on the tin of th guard, and because it was hidden inside, often dry as the Sahara, having ever been properly lubed. This makes the fully enclosed chain a double edged sword, in so far as its no guarantee it will make the chain last any longer, OOS-OOM attitude instilled, can make it last less, and cause more trouble.

Next, convolution; an exposed or semi-exposed chain is not not of sight, out of mind, and it's relatively easy to get at. More 'stuff' there is around it, more there is to go wrong, be damaged or get in the way.

For over-land 'prep' this is positive advantage. You can see the chain and spockets, and you make it a pre-ride-check, to spin the back wheel, check chain. clean chain, lube, and tension.... before you load up in the morning.... what would you rather be lugging around? 10oz of marginally useful tin bath, on the swing-arm as unsprung mass... or an extra 10oz of luggage, 'sprung' not being so shook to bits by every road bump?

Practically, a chain & Sprockets on a lightweight aught to last something ridiculous like 20K miles, almost the entire service life of the bike... IF its a decent chain to start with, properly cleaned, lubed and tensioned.

The weak-link, is the split-link.. to which there's a few precautions, from carrying a couple of spares, to omitting it all together, carying a chain-splitter instead and re-rvoting IF you eed break it for any-reason.

Next common niggle is the chain adjusters getting bent, bluggered or stripped. Agaon, a little preventative maintenance, and a couple of handy spares can get you a long way.

Most likely break-down will probably be a puncture... spare inner tubes; puncture repair kit in ready spares, an to my mind, a little preventative up-front; I would probably drill the rm to take rials style creep-clamps to hold tyres against the rim, and avoid to much internal fretting. A tyre pressure gauge, tread depth gauge and a push bike pump (for compact & light weight), would go along way to avoid too many punctures and ability to fix on the fly; BUT that pre-ride check of actually looking at the tyre as you spin the wheel to check chain looking for debris in the tread, bubbles in the wall or a warp in the rim, will go just as far.

Like said, the chain guard, is probably one of the last things to worry about. Far more is to be found in basic, simple, every day diligence and discipline, rather than gadgets.

f you have addressed all the top priorities of an over-land and this is ALL you have left to worry about, you are probably god to go anyway. if not, and this is all you are worrying about, there are probably a lot of bum-biters that will bring you to a halt, long before the chain!
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trevor saxe-coburg-gotha
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PostPosted: 09:27 - 09 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

There's only one thing better than an enclosed chain and that's an open one. At least, if you have a bike with a centre stand. That's one of the plus points of the CG - and it makes for amazingly easy chain/sprockets inspection and maintenance. So much easier than a side stand only bike.

Cleaning and lubricating the chain every couple of hundred miles will see a new chain and sprockets of decent quality last pretty much forever. At least if you're using paraffin and EP90, or very similar.

Just make a small chain care kit consisting of the necessary cleaning fluid and oil, w/ some cleanish rag (MacDonalds napkins will do at a push), and you don't need anything else.
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MCN
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PostPosted: 17:41 - 09 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

Or put a Scotoiler on it.

And spend the rest of your cash on a big eff-off seat pad. Shocked
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Baffler186
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PostPosted: 11:20 - 10 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

trevor saxe-coburg-gotha wrote:
if you have a bike with a centre stand.
Couldn't agree more. Centre stand, cover with lube, srub/wipe off, re-lube. 10 minute job if you repeat every day so things don't get too grimey.

Otherwsie, scott oiler, or you'll just have to carry a paddock stand on your back.
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andyscooter
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PostPosted: 21:27 - 10 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

Presume thou have full licence op otherwise thou can't even ride through France let alone to japan
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bellx1
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PostPosted: 21:44 - 10 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

Teflon-Mike wrote:
UK to Japan? Me Thinks how long the chain might last is probably the least of your worries!!!

Shaft-Drive-Itus.. or out-of-sight-out-of-mind. It's a myth that shaft drives are maintenance free; they are 'low' maintenance compared to a chain, but low maintenance is not NO maintenance. Its a bug-bear of the old GG when it was a current model they would frequently get run to the point the chain was so slack it was knocking on the tin of th guard, and because it was hidden inside, often dry as the Sahara, having ever been properly lubed. This makes the fully enclosed chain a double edged sword, in so far as its no guarantee it will make the chain last any longer, OOS-OOM attitude instilled, can make it last less, and cause more trouble.

Next, convolution; an exposed or semi-exposed chain is not not of sight, out of mind, and it's relatively easy to get at. More 'stuff' there is around it, more there is to go wrong, be damaged or get in the way.

For over-land 'prep' this is positive advantage. You can see the chain and spockets, and you make it a pre-ride-check, to spin the back wheel, check chain. clean chain, lube, and tension.... before you load up in the morning.... what would you rather be lugging around? 10oz of marginally useful tin bath, on the swing-arm as unsprung mass... or an extra 10oz of luggage, 'sprung' not being so shook to bits by every road bump?

Practically, a chain & Sprockets on a lightweight aught to last something ridiculous like 20K miles, almost the entire service life of the bike... IF its a decent chain to start with, properly cleaned, lubed and tensioned.

The weak-link, is the split-link.. to which there's a few precautions, from carrying a couple of spares, to omitting it all together, carying a chain-splitter instead and re-rvoting IF you eed break it for any-reason.

Next common niggle is the chain adjusters getting bent, bluggered or stripped. Agaon, a little preventative maintenance, and a couple of handy spares can get you a long way.

Most likely break-down will probably be a puncture... spare inner tubes; puncture repair kit in ready spares, an to my mind, a little preventative up-front; I would probably drill the rm to take rials style creep-clamps to hold tyres against the rim, and avoid to much internal fretting. A tyre pressure gauge, tread depth gauge and a push bike pump (for compact & light weight), would go along way to avoid too many punctures and ability to fix on the fly; BUT that pre-ride check of actually looking at the tyre as you spin the wheel to check chain looking for debris in the tread, bubbles in the wall or a warp in the rim, will go just as far.

Like said, the chain guard, is probably one of the last things to worry about. Far more is to be found in basic, simple, every day diligence and discipline, rather than gadgets.

f you have addressed all the top priorities of an over-land and this is ALL you have left to worry about, you are probably god to go anyway. if not, and this is all you are worrying about, there are probably a lot of bum-biters that will bring you to a halt, long before the chain!


Thanks for the detailed reply there's some really useful info in there! I've definitely been thinking about other stuff than just looking after my chain and I think you're right about it being "out of sight out of mind" so I'll not bother with the chain guard, then I can include it in my daily checks. I've not heard about those clamps to hold the tyre against the rim so I'll look into it for sure.
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bellx1
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PostPosted: 21:48 - 10 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

trevor saxe-coburg-gotha wrote:
There's only one thing better than an enclosed chain and that's an open one. At least, if you have a bike with a centre stand. That's one of the plus points of the CG - and it makes for amazingly easy chain/sprockets inspection and maintenance. So much easier than a side stand only bike.

Cleaning and lubricating the chain every couple of hundred miles will see a new chain and sprockets of decent quality last pretty much forever. At least if you're using paraffin and EP90, or very similar.

Just make a small chain care kit consisting of the necessary cleaning fluid and oil, w/ some cleanish rag (MacDonalds napkins will do at a push), and you don't need anything else.


Yes I do have a centre stand and thanks for the advice on lubricating my chain I make sure to look after it as much as I can when I'm out there!

Quote:
Or put a Scotoiler on it


This looks interesting I'll have a look into it thanks for the idea!
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bellx1
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PostPosted: 21:50 - 10 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

andyscooter wrote:
Presume thou have full licence op otherwise thou can't even ride through France let alone to japan


Not yet I'll be doing it before I go though
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Teflon-Mike
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PostPosted: 12:52 - 11 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

BellX1 wrote:
andyscooter wrote:
Presume thou have full licence op otherwise thou can't even ride through France let alone to japan
Not yet I'll be doing it before I go though

This would be rather higher up the list than a scotoiler, I think.
Have you read Jupiter's travels?
Ted Simon planned his round the world trip, not merely before he had even got a motorbike licence, but before he had even ridden a motorbike.
He also did a lot of planning, and a lot of packing and learned a heck of a lot the very very hard way..
From your start-point your could be re-inventing the square wheel.

Oh-Kay... my advice then; here and now the chain-guard is about the last thing you need worry about. Oft offered advice to ANY learner is to get a licence, THAT has to be your number one top priority.

A1 licence tests costs under 150. There's no excuse for not getting stuck in and getting them sussed. Folk do full licences in a week, via a DAS course, absolutely no reason that if you get clued up and pay attention, you cant have an A1 licence DIY inside a couple of months.

Next, get miles under your belt.... in the UK, with a mobile phone and an AA card in your pocket.

How far is the furthest you have ridden on your CG? Whats the longest time you have spent n the saddle at a stretch? How young are you? Do you have any 'off-road' experience?

I was by age 21, pretty familiar with 8 hour stretch in the saddle on a 125... I wouldn't even night-mare of the notion these days! The rose tinted spex give a rather warm hue to a lot, but, I still recall it wasn't ALL plain sailing and joy! And even though I know I was an awful lot younger, dumber and numb-er in my youth, I DO still recall 250 mile trecks, limping to the window, and looking at the bike, and thinking "Err... no maybe tomorrow!"I DO remember the pain! I also recall wobbling into motorway service stations and spending half an hour an the bogs, pressing the hand dryer button with my nose, trying to thaw out my hands and pipe warm air into my wet weathers... and again, looking out the window at the bike, and really, REALLY not wanting to go out and get back on.

And I had by that point a decade of competition trials experience. And worth mentioning; those events are maybe 12 sections, ridden 3-4 times, taking perhaps 2min a section; two-hours actual 'track' time, maybe as long again riding between sections, but most sat in the queue waiting. All slow speed, barely above walking pace, looks EASY I tell you..... till you try it!

Seriously, I have had lads come and 'have a go' try on section and hand me the bike back! On course, the 'Newby' course s laid out deliberately 'easy', yet, so many first timers barely make the first lap, because of how physically tough t is, especially for a newby, lacking technique and learning as they go.

On an over-land.... London-Tokyo... google suggests 'over-land' route through Europe, Poland, Russia, Mongolia, Korea, then a boat.... I don't know if that's your intended route..... but see Charlie & Ewan's epic long-way-round, and pay particular attention to the Mongolia section; the difficulty they had getting travel permits, and the fact that they killed a BMW in the desert.... also take note of Claudio, in Mongolia on a Russian Jawa 2T twin copy, having a far lighter time of it.....

I that one is a lesson in horses for courses, and the old Russian 'clunker' tilting the tables, in lacking technology to go wrong, and where its bound to, possessing old fashioned hammer-and-tog, village black-smith 'serviceability'... the BMW's fancy electronics fired when they tried to weld the snapped frame!

However, point is, that a large part of this journey is likely on bad roads, unmade roads, or simply NO roads.....

Ted Simons careful preparation and calculators fell apart as soon as he hit Dirt in the Sahara... he ran out of petrol! Bikes don't return the 'highway' MPG figure quoted n the brochure, when grinding through the rough. in 2nd gear for hours at a stretch... and eve if you could make allowance for that, it would still go out the window when you are lying n the muck, thinking "Do I REALLY have to pick this all up a-effing-gain?!?!"..... fuel peeing out of the overflow onto the floor

Which is another useful illustration of just how high up the list a Scot-oiler or other chain-life extending device, should come, and maybe, a light, tought, plastic petrol can, preferably FULL, that wont so readily leak its precious contents if you drop the bike, ad might get you to the ext fuel stop after you have, MAY be slightly more worth-while....

But, back to top; off-road experience. From memory, a motocross event is three 15-minute hears, 45-minutes of saddle time, and it's apparently five times more physically demanding than proffessonal soccer.

To hack it, you HAVE to be fit, you have to have the technique, or it will just be pan layed on pan, layed on frustration, getting no-where fast.

And you are contemplating 8000 odd miles of it.. of which you will have something like a three weeks worth of full working days, every day, doing nothing BUT grind through a non-stop off-road course.

Sod the chain guard, get down the gym!

And a bit of technique wont hurt. Some off-road experience s going to help, and the more yo get, the more it will help, when you are man-handling an over-loaded light-weight around the loose!

Ted Simon may have done it in his nievty, forty years ago, I wouldn't!!

I would be planning a lot of evening rides, to build up my familiarity in the saddle on tarmac; I would be planning a lot of off-road on the week-end to try get some of that technique, AND, once I had a full licence. I would be planning a few ferry trips and long week-enders, into places like France & Holland, to get familiar with riding on the wrong side of the road..... showing paper-work to officious men with machine guns, and likely at least a working knowledge of the English Language!!! Etc etc etc.. all within at least 200 miles of a British Embassy!

Meanwhile, I would be dong a LOT of research on my route, necessary visas, and fuel availablty, and where necessary, filing forms and posting letters to get necessary paperwork.

Worth notng from LWR, Charlie & Ewan were fully supported, and had two secrtaries working full time in an office, and meetngs with experts and embassy offiials to try sort the paperwork.. and STILL they struggled...... the hassles ramped by tier support, it has to be admitted, BUT this is no small part of the job... and still far more important than whether you need the fully enclosed chain guard or a scott-oiler!

IF that lot, hasn't daunted you and made you at least ponder whether you may be biting off more than you can chew, and where your priorities might actually be best laid.....

Old rule of racing; before you look for MORE than standard, make sure you have all you should AS standard.

8-9k Miles n one hike.... that is half the total anticipated service miles of a typcal 125, new in the show-room......

And grinding through the rough for a large proportion of that, they will be hard miles. Hauling the thing out of holes when you have dumped it, even harder.

The CG125 hasn't been in UK brochures to my knowledge for at least a decade... its far fro a spring chicken; how many miles of useful life does ANY of it have left in it?

As far as prep on the bike goes, I would likely be starting with a full tear down over-haul.

The wheels, are spoked. For a 10K over-land? For piece of mind, I would want to pull them; fit new bearing & seals, and re-spoke them, probably re-rm them. Probably be chapr to get brand new Chinky replacements... but peace of mind, would probably be no higher with them than the originals! As for spares; a spoke key, to daily check tenson and true, would be on my list, and far higher on the list than the chain lubing.

I am probbaly slghtly over-aware of the niggle, but I have had a wheel collapse on me, off-road... it hurts! Even if you are only dong 8mph! Its also a bludy ball-ache, when you have to give up, and carry the bike a couple of hudred yards back to the car to haul it home..... magine being sat the middle of the Mongolian, wondering how far to the nearest Yurt, and how to get bike fixed?

Brakes would be next on my list of look ats; and they would get new shes all-round; ad the back-plates very carefully stripped, cleaned, and re-assembled with new grease. New cables would be fitted, and attention pad to adjustment, and making sure that adjusters and stff weren't over stressed, or likely to get bent or broke by a knock.

If you have a later, disc-brake CG... I would be mindful of using earlier front drum hub.... Discs dont work very well when the fluid has all leaked out of a split hose or loose uo, or cracked master cylinder, and these are rather much harder to fix with a swiss army pen-knife and an old coat-hanger....

Suspension? Well you can go rigid with a broom handle or a bit of angle iron I suppose, ad keeping speeds down, it would get you home.... perhaps.... but better if you have got it to start with, and f you have it, especially loaded for an epic over-land, its gog to take a pounding eve before you get off tar... brand new good quality springs in the forks, and brand new decent quality shocks on the rear, would be on the must-have list, along with new bushes, on shocks and swing arm; whlst careful attension would be paid to the forks, the slider bushes the stanchions, and fork seals, which I would replace as course, and carry spares, and belt and braces, with boh dust caps and gaiters.

Steering bearings? I'd defintely replace as course. Taper-Roller bearings would be something I'd delberate over. New, they would probably never fail, but out n the wild if they did, I'd probably never get a replacement. Loose balls are a pain, and loosing one in the soil is NO fun believe me... but, you can carry spares, they don't take much weight or room, and a C-Spanner to adjust would have to be in the tool-kit anyway.

Handlebars? Cant carry spares, they are prone to damage. Old trials tip is to only 'nip' the up n the clamps, so that a hefty wack will move them rather than bend them...

Brush guards? nip-clamped like bars, can be useful, and just junked if they get the way. Save some knuckles in the bush, plus stones, and do a lot to keep fingers out the worst wet and wind. May also stave off some drop damage along the way too. THESE are a 'mod' I would consider.

Motor? CG's suffer 'you cant go wrong with a CG' legend. They CAN go wrong! And low maintenance doesn't mean no maintenance. If the motor is old and tired, to start with, whats chances it will survive best part of 10K hard riding more? Its probably due an overhaul now! So give it one before you go, its a darn site easier in the arm of your own shed, with all tools on hand (or e-bay!) than at the side of some Kazakhstani track in the mountains!

A-N-D.. that planned maintenance on route would have to include oil changes, which I would probably shorten to perhaps 500 miles, and more in the rough going. New spark plug with each one, in 10K miles you would probably want a dozen or more! Tappts should be done every other oil change; oft chewed to bldgery on an old motor, brand new ones would be fitted along with stem-seals on over-haul, and the offical tappet tool makes the job of tickling them and NOT chewing the heads a blessing, and if the job is likely to be needed over half a dozen times at side of the road, seems silly not to take them to me.

And so it goes on.... As course I would strip the frame to bare metal.
No point worrying about over sized luggage racks to bolt to the fame if the frame itself is weak with good old British t-worm..... and again I'd pay attention to the mounting, and apply nip-bar thinking to the mounts, I would rather have a luggage rack snap than a frame!

I wouldn't get frame powder coated; powder coat is great until it gets chipped. Looks good, but doesn't make finding damage or repairing it easy. So I'd be laguering on smooth-rite with a brush, and chasng it into all the cooks and nannies.

All told, I would expect to have to spend almost as much completely renovating an old bike like this, as buying a new one....

Yamaha YBR is what, 2500? Probably still need a far bit of pre-prep, but way way less! And in all up costs of the expedition?

Lets just rough cut this. 10K miles. CG's might, in more deal conditions return 100mpg, ocassionally.. you will not be running in ideal conditions very often, you will be lucky to better 70mpg, you are looking at around 150 gallons of petrol, before however much dribbles on the floor along the way, that's what, 1000 JUST for fuel....basic service items like oil and plugs, chain lube and tyres, even here in the UK would likely add half as much again.

All in cost from London-to-Tokyo, well, an air fare is what, just under 500? 1000 on fuel, 500 on service spares, and if you are very very lucky, 1500 worth of bike, before you start adding accessories or tools, to the list, let alone accommodation and living expenses.

THIS is not goig to be a chap trip.... FUN? Possibly. An adventure, certainly? Worth it? Well, that will be down to you if you get home.

BUT, in the overall scheme of stuff, a few hundred quid saved on the price of a bike, and eve the difference between a clapped out 500 CG and a brand new YBR starts to pale into insignificance.

Similarly in the rankings of 'hassles' long the way; so much is completely unrelated to the bike; your route; support along the way; facilities along the way; visas and permits, etc will take far more sorting than an auto-oiler! and in what will actually make more difference to being repatriated by ex Russian millitery and arriving in Tokyo, a over-land 'hero'... whether an exposed or enclosed chain is 'better'... it really shouldn't even factor on the list!

Getting that licence is top priority.

Getting miles under your belt, next.

Getting some useful saddle experience on and off road, next again.

Getting some 'foreign' riding experience where you are less likely to be left in the desert with a 7.62 slug n your skull, is rather more important

Etc

etc

etc.

You are a LONG long way, from making this trip a reality, at the moment..... Dos it even stand a chance? If so, is the CG the best bike to contemplate doing it on? And if so, what REALLY aught be done b way of prep to get t there... both bike and you.

Old biker once told me, there's few problems in life that cant be solved by the expedence of expending large chunks of cold cash, so the only 'real' problem in life tends to be getting your hands on large chunks of cold hard cash......

10K miles. At least 1000 of go-juice... how much is t really likely to cost? THAT is the the first problem to tackle.
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alains
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PostPosted: 15:30 - 11 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

it's avaiable , look here
https://www.bike-parts.fr/pieces-honda-detail-1439-17KGA401-CG125ES4-2006-F__2100-CG+125.html
in UK here
http://www.davidsilverspares.co.uk/parts/by-part-number/hpart_40510KGA900/
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Nobby the Bastard
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PostPosted: 15:33 - 11 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

Teflon-Mike wrote:

This would be rather higher up the list than a scotoiler, I think.
Have you read Jupiter's travels?
Ted Simon planned his round the world trip, not merely before he had even got a motorbike licence, but before he had even ridden a motorbike.
He also did a lot of planning, and a lot of packing and learned a heck of a lot the very very hard way..
From your start-point your could be re-inventing the square wheel.

Oh-Kay... my advice then; here and now the chain-guard is about the last thing you need worry about. Oft offered advice to ANY learner is to get a licence, THAT has to be your number one top priority.

A1 licence tests costs under 150. There's no excuse for not getting stuck in and getting them sussed. Folk do full licences in a week, via a DAS course, absolutely no reason that if you get clued up and pay attention, you cant have an A1 licence DIY inside a couple of months.

Next, get miles under your belt.... in the UK, with a mobile phone and an AA card in your pocket.

How far is the furthest you have ridden on your CG? Whats the longest time you have spent n the saddle at a stretch? How young are you? Do you have any 'off-road' experience?

I was by age 21, pretty familiar with 8 hour stretch in the saddle on a 125... I wouldn't even night-mare of the notion these days! The rose tinted spex give a rather warm hue to a lot, but, I still recall it wasn't ALL plain sailing and joy! And even though I know I was an awful lot younger, dumber and numb-er in my youth, I DO still recall 250 mile trecks, limping to the window, and looking at the bike, and thinking "Err... no maybe tomorrow!"I DO remember the pain! I also recall wobbling into motorway service stations and spending half an hour an the bogs, pressing the hand dryer button with my nose, trying to thaw out my hands and pipe warm air into my wet weathers... and again, looking out the window at the bike, and really, REALLY not wanting to go out and get back on.

And I had by that point a decade of competition trials experience. And worth mentioning; those events are maybe 12 sections, ridden 3-4 times, taking perhaps 2min a section; two-hours actual 'track' time, maybe as long again riding between sections, but most sat in the queue waiting. All slow speed, barely above walking pace, looks EASY I tell you..... till you try it!

Seriously, I have had lads come and 'have a go' try on section and hand me the bike back! On course, the 'Newby' course s laid out deliberately 'easy', yet, so many first timers barely make the first lap, because of how physically tough t is, especially for a newby, lacking technique and learning as they go.

On an over-land.... London-Tokyo... google suggests 'over-land' route through Europe, Poland, Russia, Mongolia, Korea, then a boat.... I don't know if that's your intended route..... but see Charlie & Ewan's epic long-way-round, and pay particular attention to the Mongolia section; the difficulty they had getting travel permits, and the fact that they killed a BMW in the desert.... also take note of Claudio, in Mongolia on a Russian Jawa 2T twin copy, having a far lighter time of it.....

I that one is a lesson in horses for courses, and the old Russian 'clunker' tilting the tables, in lacking technology to go wrong, and where its bound to, possessing old fashioned hammer-and-tog, village black-smith 'serviceability'... the BMW's fancy electronics fired when they tried to weld the snapped frame!

However, point is, that a large part of this journey is likely on bad roads, unmade roads, or simply NO roads.....

Ted Simons careful preparation and calculators fell apart as soon as he hit Dirt in the Sahara... he ran out of petrol! Bikes don't return the 'highway' MPG figure quoted n the brochure, when grinding through the rough. in 2nd gear for hours at a stretch... and eve if you could make allowance for that, it would still go out the window when you are lying n the muck, thinking "Do I REALLY have to pick this all up a-effing-gain?!?!"..... fuel peeing out of the overflow onto the floor

Which is another useful illustration of just how high up the list a Scot-oiler or other chain-life extending device, should come, and maybe, a light, tought, plastic petrol can, preferably FULL, that wont so readily leak its precious contents if you drop the bike, ad might get you to the ext fuel stop after you have, MAY be slightly more worth-while....

But, back to top; off-road experience. From memory, a motocross event is three 15-minute hears, 45-minutes of saddle time, and it's apparently five times more physically demanding than proffessonal soccer.

To hack it, you HAVE to be fit, you have to have the technique, or it will just be pan layed on pan, layed on frustration, getting no-where fast.

And you are contemplating 8000 odd miles of it.. of which you will have something like a three weeks worth of full working days, every day, doing nothing BUT grind through a non-stop off-road course.

Sod the chain guard, get down the gym!

And a bit of technique wont hurt. Some off-road experience s going to help, and the more yo get, the more it will help, when you are man-handling an over-loaded light-weight around the loose!

Ted Simon may have done it in his nievty, forty years ago, I wouldn't!!

I would be planning a lot of evening rides, to build up my familiarity in the saddle on tarmac; I would be planning a lot of off-road on the week-end to try get some of that technique, AND, once I had a full licence. I would be planning a few ferry trips and long week-enders, into places like France & Holland, to get familiar with riding on the wrong side of the road..... showing paper-work to officious men with machine guns, and likely at least a working knowledge of the English Language!!! Etc etc etc.. all within at least 200 miles of a British Embassy!

Meanwhile, I would be dong a LOT of research on my route, necessary visas, and fuel availablty, and where necessary, filing forms and posting letters to get necessary paperwork.

Worth notng from LWR, Charlie & Ewan were fully supported, and had two secrtaries working full time in an office, and meetngs with experts and embassy offiials to try sort the paperwork.. and STILL they struggled...... the hassles ramped by tier support, it has to be admitted, BUT this is no small part of the job... and still far more important than whether you need the fully enclosed chain guard or a scott-oiler!

IF that lot, hasn't daunted you and made you at least ponder whether you may be biting off more than you can chew, and where your priorities might actually be best laid.....

Old rule of racing; before you look for MORE than standard, make sure you have all you should AS standard.

8-9k Miles n one hike.... that is half the total anticipated service miles of a typcal 125, new in the show-room......

And grinding through the rough for a large proportion of that, they will be hard miles. Hauling the thing out of holes when you have dumped it, even harder.

The CG125 hasn't been in UK brochures to my knowledge for at least a decade... its far fro a spring chicken; how many miles of useful life does ANY of it have left in it?

As far as prep on the bike goes, I would likely be starting with a full tear down over-haul.

The wheels, are spoked. For a 10K over-land? For piece of mind, I would want to pull them; fit new bearing & seals, and re-spoke them, probably re-rm them. Probably be chapr to get brand new Chinky replacements... but peace of mind, would probably be no higher with them than the originals! As for spares; a spoke key, to daily check tenson and true, would be on my list, and far higher on the list than the chain lubing.

I am probbaly slghtly over-aware of the niggle, but I have had a wheel collapse on me, off-road... it hurts! Even if you are only dong 8mph! Its also a bludy ball-ache, when you have to give up, and carry the bike a couple of hudred yards back to the car to haul it home..... magine being sat the middle of the Mongolian, wondering how far to the nearest Yurt, and how to get bike fixed?

Brakes would be next on my list of look ats; and they would get new shes all-round; ad the back-plates very carefully stripped, cleaned, and re-assembled with new grease. New cables would be fitted, and attention pad to adjustment, and making sure that adjusters and stff weren't over stressed, or likely to get bent or broke by a knock.

If you have a later, disc-brake CG... I would be mindful of using earlier front drum hub.... Discs dont work very well when the fluid has all leaked out of a split hose or loose uo, or cracked master cylinder, and these are rather much harder to fix with a swiss army pen-knife and an old coat-hanger....

Suspension? Well you can go rigid with a broom handle or a bit of angle iron I suppose, ad keeping speeds down, it would get you home.... perhaps.... but better if you have got it to start with, and f you have it, especially loaded for an epic over-land, its gog to take a pounding eve before you get off tar... brand new good quality springs in the forks, and brand new decent quality shocks on the rear, would be on the must-have list, along with new bushes, on shocks and swing arm; whlst careful attension would be paid to the forks, the slider bushes the stanchions, and fork seals, which I would replace as course, and carry spares, and belt and braces, with boh dust caps and gaiters.

Steering bearings? I'd defintely replace as course. Taper-Roller bearings would be something I'd delberate over. New, they would probably never fail, but out n the wild if they did, I'd probably never get a replacement. Loose balls are a pain, and loosing one in the soil is NO fun believe me... but, you can carry spares, they don't take much weight or room, and a C-Spanner to adjust would have to be in the tool-kit anyway.

Handlebars? Cant carry spares, they are prone to damage. Old trials tip is to only 'nip' the up n the clamps, so that a hefty wack will move them rather than bend them...

Brush guards? nip-clamped like bars, can be useful, and just junked if they get the way. Save some knuckles in the bush, plus stones, and do a lot to keep fingers out the worst wet and wind. May also stave off some drop damage along the way too. THESE are a 'mod' I would consider.

Motor? CG's suffer 'you cant go wrong with a CG' legend. They CAN go wrong! And low maintenance doesn't mean no maintenance. If the motor is old and tired, to start with, whats chances it will survive best part of 10K hard riding more? Its probably due an overhaul now! So give it one before you go, its a darn site easier in the arm of your own shed, with all tools on hand (or e-bay!) than at the side of some Kazakhstani track in the mountains!

A-N-D.. that planned maintenance on route would have to include oil changes, which I would probably shorten to perhaps 500 miles, and more in the rough going. New spark plug with each one, in 10K miles you would probably want a dozen or more! Tappts should be done every other oil change; oft chewed to bldgery on an old motor, brand new ones would be fitted along with stem-seals on over-haul, and the offical tappet tool makes the job of tickling them and NOT chewing the heads a blessing, and if the job is likely to be needed over half a dozen times at side of the road, seems silly not to take them to me.

And so it goes on.... As course I would strip the frame to bare metal.
No point worrying about over sized luggage racks to bolt to the fame if the frame itself is weak with good old British t-worm..... and again I'd pay attention to the mounting, and apply nip-bar thinking to the mounts, I would rather have a luggage rack snap than a frame!

I wouldn't get frame powder coated; powder coat is great until it gets chipped. Looks good, but doesn't make finding damage or repairing it easy. So I'd be laguering on smooth-rite with a brush, and chasng it into all the cooks and nannies.

All told, I would expect to have to spend almost as much completely renovating an old bike like this, as buying a new one....

Yamaha YBR is what, 2500? Probably still need a far bit of pre-prep, but way way less! And in all up costs of the expedition?

Lets just rough cut this. 10K miles. CG's might, in more deal conditions return 100mpg, ocassionally.. you will not be running in ideal conditions very often, you will be lucky to better 70mpg, you are looking at around 150 gallons of petrol, before however much dribbles on the floor along the way, that's what, 1000 JUST for fuel....basic service items like oil and plugs, chain lube and tyres, even here in the UK would likely add half as much again.

All in cost from London-to-Tokyo, well, an air fare is what, just under 500? 1000 on fuel, 500 on service spares, and if you are very very lucky, 1500 worth of bike, before you start adding accessories or tools, to the list, let alone accommodation and living expenses.

THIS is not goig to be a chap trip.... FUN? Possibly. An adventure, certainly? Worth it? Well, that will be down to you if you get home.

BUT, in the overall scheme of stuff, a few hundred quid saved on the price of a bike, and eve the difference between a clapped out 500 CG and a brand new YBR starts to pale into insignificance.

Similarly in the rankings of 'hassles' long the way; so much is completely unrelated to the bike; your route; support along the way; facilities along the way; visas and permits, etc will take far more sorting than an auto-oiler! and in what will actually make more difference to being repatriated by ex Russian millitery and arriving in Tokyo, a over-land 'hero'... whether an exposed or enclosed chain is 'better'... it really shouldn't even factor on the list!

Getting that licence is top priority.

Getting miles under your belt, next.

Getting some useful saddle experience on and off road, next again.

Getting some 'foreign' riding experience where you are less likely to be left in the desert with a 7.62 slug n your skull, is rather more important

Etc

etc

etc.

You are a LONG long way, from making this trip a reality, at the moment..... Dos it even stand a chance? If so, is the CG the best bike to contemplate doing it on? And if so, what REALLY aught be done b way of prep to get t there... both bike and you.

Old biker once told me, there's few problems in life that cant be solved by the expedence of expending large chunks of cold cash, so the only 'real' problem in life tends to be getting your hands on large chunks of cold hard cash......

10K miles. At least 1000 of go-juice... how much is t really likely to cost? THAT is the the first problem to tackle.


What the actual fuck? Do you really think anyone actually bothered to read that?
Christ, I think it's time someone told the social that you have far too much time on your hands and it's time you were forced to get a job.
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Teflon-Mike
tl;dr



Joined: 01 Jun 2010
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PostPosted: 16:04 - 11 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

9ooo miles, on a CG125... over-land... averaging perhaps 25mph, at best, if he doesn't fall off too much, or add in time to do maintenance & repairs... is seven weeks pure saddle time.... probably five months on the road.... and that is on top of the time to get a licence, plan & prep...

Quicker to read my ramblings, me thinks, than watch LWR... let alone read Jupietrs, or read/watch any of the many other epic travelogues
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Current Bikes:'Honda VF1000F' ;'CB750F2N' ;'CB125TD ( 6 3 of em!)'; 'Montesa Cota 248'. Learner FAQ's:= 'U want to Ride a Motorbike! Where Do U start?'
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Ste
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Joined: 01 Sep 2002
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PostPosted: 16:14 - 11 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's only 2,674 words Razz
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Nobby the Bastard
World Chat Champion



Joined: 16 Aug 2013
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PostPosted: 17:02 - 11 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ste wrote:
It's only 2,674 words Razz


I wrote less than that on my last 3 1/2 hour exam. Got 94%....
____________________
Pete:"One thing you can count on - if Pol's involved it's bound to go full Jeremy Kyle" Rogerborg:"I took Mrs Borg out for some naughty back alley action on my tiddler."
trevor saxe-coburg-gotha:"Remember this simple rule - scooters are for men who like to feel the breeze on their huge, flapping cunt lips."
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bellx1
Derestricted Danger



Joined: 08 Jan 2018
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PostPosted: 20:56 - 12 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
This would be rather higher up the list than a scotoiler, I think.
Have you read Jupiter's travels?
Ted Simon planned his round the world trip, not merely before he had even got a motorbike licence, but before he had even ridden a motorbike.
He also did a lot of planning, and a lot of packing and learned a heck of a lot the very very hard way..
From your start-point your could be re-inventing the square wheel.

Oh-Kay... my advice then; here and now the chain-guard is about the last thing you need worry about. Oft offered advice to ANY learner is to get a licence, THAT has to be your number one top priority.

A1 licence tests costs under 150. There's no excuse for not getting stuck in and getting them sussed. Folk do full licences in a week, via a DAS course, absolutely no reason that if you get clued up and pay attention, you cant have an A1 licence DIY inside a couple of months.

Next, get miles under your belt.... in the UK, with a mobile phone and an AA card in your pocket.

How far is the furthest you have ridden on your CG? Whats the longest time you have spent n the saddle at a stretch? How young are you? Do you have any 'off-road' experience?

I was by age 21, pretty familiar with 8 hour stretch in the saddle on a 125... I wouldn't even night-mare of the notion these days! The rose tinted spex give a rather warm hue to a lot, but, I still recall it wasn't ALL plain sailing and joy! And even though I know I was an awful lot younger, dumber and numb-er in my youth, I DO still recall 250 mile trecks, limping to the window, and looking at the bike, and thinking "Err... no maybe tomorrow!"I DO remember the pain! I also recall wobbling into motorway service stations and spending half an hour an the bogs, pressing the hand dryer button with my nose, trying to thaw out my hands and pipe warm air into my wet weathers... and again, looking out the window at the bike, and really, REALLY not wanting to go out and get back on.

And I had by that point a decade of competition trials experience. And worth mentioning; those events are maybe 12 sections, ridden 3-4 times, taking perhaps 2min a section; two-hours actual 'track' time, maybe as long again riding between sections, but most sat in the queue waiting. All slow speed, barely above walking pace, looks EASY I tell you..... till you try it!

Seriously, I have had lads come and 'have a go' try on section and hand me the bike back! On course, the 'Newby' course s laid out deliberately 'easy', yet, so many first timers barely make the first lap, because of how physically tough t is, especially for a newby, lacking technique and learning as they go.

On an over-land.... London-Tokyo... google suggests 'over-land' route through Europe, Poland, Russia, Mongolia, Korea, then a boat.... I don't know if that's your intended route..... but see Charlie & Ewan's epic long-way-round, and pay particular attention to the Mongolia section; the difficulty they had getting travel permits, and the fact that they killed a BMW in the desert.... also take note of Claudio, in Mongolia on a Russian Jawa 2T twin copy, having a far lighter time of it.....

I that one is a lesson in horses for courses, and the old Russian 'clunker' tilting the tables, in lacking technology to go wrong, and where its bound to, possessing old fashioned hammer-and-tog, village black-smith 'serviceability'... the BMW's fancy electronics fired when they tried to weld the snapped frame!

However, point is, that a large part of this journey is likely on bad roads, unmade roads, or simply NO roads.....

Ted Simons careful preparation and calculators fell apart as soon as he hit Dirt in the Sahara... he ran out of petrol! Bikes don't return the 'highway' MPG figure quoted n the brochure, when grinding through the rough. in 2nd gear for hours at a stretch... and eve if you could make allowance for that, it would still go out the window when you are lying n the muck, thinking "Do I REALLY have to pick this all up a-effing-gain?!?!"..... fuel peeing out of the overflow onto the floor

Which is another useful illustration of just how high up the list a Scot-oiler or other chain-life extending device, should come, and maybe, a light, tought, plastic petrol can, preferably FULL, that wont so readily leak its precious contents if you drop the bike, ad might get you to the ext fuel stop after you have, MAY be slightly more worth-while....

But, back to top; off-road experience. From memory, a motocross event is three 15-minute hears, 45-minutes of saddle time, and it's apparently five times more physically demanding than proffessonal soccer.

To hack it, you HAVE to be fit, you have to have the technique, or it will just be pan layed on pan, layed on frustration, getting no-where fast.

And you are contemplating 8000 odd miles of it.. of which you will have something like a three weeks worth of full working days, every day, doing nothing BUT grind through a non-stop off-road course.

Sod the chain guard, get down the gym!

And a bit of technique wont hurt. Some off-road experience s going to help, and the more yo get, the more it will help, when you are man-handling an over-loaded light-weight around the loose!

Ted Simon may have done it in his nievty, forty years ago, I wouldn't!!

I would be planning a lot of evening rides, to build up my familiarity in the saddle on tarmac; I would be planning a lot of off-road on the week-end to try get some of that technique, AND, once I had a full licence. I would be planning a few ferry trips and long week-enders, into places like France & Holland, to get familiar with riding on the wrong side of the road..... showing paper-work to officious men with machine guns, and likely at least a working knowledge of the English Language!!! Etc etc etc.. all within at least 200 miles of a British Embassy!

Meanwhile, I would be dong a LOT of research on my route, necessary visas, and fuel availablty, and where necessary, filing forms and posting letters to get necessary paperwork.

Worth notng from LWR, Charlie & Ewan were fully supported, and had two secrtaries working full time in an office, and meetngs with experts and embassy offiials to try sort the paperwork.. and STILL they struggled...... the hassles ramped by tier support, it has to be admitted, BUT this is no small part of the job... and still far more important than whether you need the fully enclosed chain guard or a scott-oiler!

IF that lot, hasn't daunted you and made you at least ponder whether you may be biting off more than you can chew, and where your priorities might actually be best laid.....

Old rule of racing; before you look for MORE than standard, make sure you have all you should AS standard.

8-9k Miles n one hike.... that is half the total anticipated service miles of a typcal 125, new in the show-room......

And grinding through the rough for a large proportion of that, they will be hard miles. Hauling the thing out of holes when you have dumped it, even harder.

The CG125 hasn't been in UK brochures to my knowledge for at least a decade... its far fro a spring chicken; how many miles of useful life does ANY of it have left in it?

As far as prep on the bike goes, I would likely be starting with a full tear down over-haul.

The wheels, are spoked. For a 10K over-land? For piece of mind, I would want to pull them; fit new bearing & seals, and re-spoke them, probably re-rm them. Probably be chapr to get brand new Chinky replacements... but peace of mind, would probably be no higher with them than the originals! As for spares; a spoke key, to daily check tenson and true, would be on my list, and far higher on the list than the chain lubing.

I am probbaly slghtly over-aware of the niggle, but I have had a wheel collapse on me, off-road... it hurts! Even if you are only dong 8mph! Its also a bludy ball-ache, when you have to give up, and carry the bike a couple of hudred yards back to the car to haul it home..... magine being sat the middle of the Mongolian, wondering how far to the nearest Yurt, and how to get bike fixed?

Brakes would be next on my list of look ats; and they would get new shes all-round; ad the back-plates very carefully stripped, cleaned, and re-assembled with new grease. New cables would be fitted, and attention pad to adjustment, and making sure that adjusters and stff weren't over stressed, or likely to get bent or broke by a knock.

If you have a later, disc-brake CG... I would be mindful of using earlier front drum hub.... Discs dont work very well when the fluid has all leaked out of a split hose or loose uo, or cracked master cylinder, and these are rather much harder to fix with a swiss army pen-knife and an old coat-hanger....

Suspension? Well you can go rigid with a broom handle or a bit of angle iron I suppose, ad keeping speeds down, it would get you home.... perhaps.... but better if you have got it to start with, and f you have it, especially loaded for an epic over-land, its gog to take a pounding eve before you get off tar... brand new good quality springs in the forks, and brand new decent quality shocks on the rear, would be on the must-have list, along with new bushes, on shocks and swing arm; whlst careful attension would be paid to the forks, the slider bushes the stanchions, and fork seals, which I would replace as course, and carry spares, and belt and braces, with boh dust caps and gaiters.

Steering bearings? I'd defintely replace as course. Taper-Roller bearings would be something I'd delberate over. New, they would probably never fail, but out n the wild if they did, I'd probably never get a replacement. Loose balls are a pain, and loosing one in the soil is NO fun believe me... but, you can carry spares, they don't take much weight or room, and a C-Spanner to adjust would have to be in the tool-kit anyway.

Handlebars? Cant carry spares, they are prone to damage. Old trials tip is to only 'nip' the up n the clamps, so that a hefty wack will move them rather than bend them...

Brush guards? nip-clamped like bars, can be useful, and just junked if they get the way. Save some knuckles in the bush, plus stones, and do a lot to keep fingers out the worst wet and wind. May also stave off some drop damage along the way too. THESE are a 'mod' I would consider.

Motor? CG's suffer 'you cant go wrong with a CG' legend. They CAN go wrong! And low maintenance doesn't mean no maintenance. If the motor is old and tired, to start with, whats chances it will survive best part of 10K hard riding more? Its probably due an overhaul now! So give it one before you go, its a darn site easier in the arm of your own shed, with all tools on hand (or e-bay!) than at the side of some Kazakhstani track in the mountains!

A-N-D.. that planned maintenance on route would have to include oil changes, which I would probably shorten to perhaps 500 miles, and more in the rough going. New spark plug with each one, in 10K miles you would probably want a dozen or more! Tappts should be done every other oil change; oft chewed to bldgery on an old motor, brand new ones would be fitted along with stem-seals on over-haul, and the offical tappet tool makes the job of tickling them and NOT chewing the heads a blessing, and if the job is likely to be needed over half a dozen times at side of the road, seems silly not to take them to me.

And so it goes on.... As course I would strip the frame to bare metal.
No point worrying about over sized luggage racks to bolt to the fame if the frame itself is weak with good old British t-worm..... and again I'd pay attention to the mounting, and apply nip-bar thinking to the mounts, I would rather have a luggage rack snap than a frame!

I wouldn't get frame powder coated; powder coat is great until it gets chipped. Looks good, but doesn't make finding damage or repairing it easy. So I'd be laguering on smooth-rite with a brush, and chasng it into all the cooks and nannies.

All told, I would expect to have to spend almost as much completely renovating an old bike like this, as buying a new one....

Yamaha YBR is what, 2500? Probably still need a far bit of pre-prep, but way way less! And in all up costs of the expedition?

Lets just rough cut this. 10K miles. CG's might, in more deal conditions return 100mpg, ocassionally.. you will not be running in ideal conditions very often, you will be lucky to better 70mpg, you are looking at around 150 gallons of petrol, before however much dribbles on the floor along the way, that's what, 1000 JUST for fuel....basic service items like oil and plugs, chain lube and tyres, even here in the UK would likely add half as much again.

All in cost from London-to-Tokyo, well, an air fare is what, just under 500? 1000 on fuel, 500 on service spares, and if you are very very lucky, 1500 worth of bike, before you start adding accessories or tools, to the list, let alone accommodation and living expenses.

THIS is not goig to be a chap trip.... FUN? Possibly. An adventure, certainly? Worth it? Well, that will be down to you if you get home.

BUT, in the overall scheme of stuff, a few hundred quid saved on the price of a bike, and eve the difference between a clapped out 500 CG and a brand new YBR starts to pale into insignificance.

Similarly in the rankings of 'hassles' long the way; so much is completely unrelated to the bike; your route; support along the way; facilities along the way; visas and permits, etc will take far more sorting than an auto-oiler! and in what will actually make more difference to being repatriated by ex Russian millitery and arriving in Tokyo, a over-land 'hero'... whether an exposed or enclosed chain is 'better'... it really shouldn't even factor on the list!

Getting that licence is top priority.

Getting miles under your belt, next.

Getting some useful saddle experience on and off road, next again.

Getting some 'foreign' riding experience where you are less likely to be left in the desert with a 7.62 slug n your skull, is rather more important

Etc

etc

etc.

You are a LONG long way, from making this trip a reality, at the moment..... Dos it even stand a chance? If so, is the CG the best bike to contemplate doing it on? And if so, what REALLY aught be done b way of prep to get t there... both bike and you.

Old biker once told me, there's few problems in life that cant be solved by the expedence of expending large chunks of cold cash, so the only 'real' problem in life tends to be getting your hands on large chunks of cold hard cash......

10K miles. At least 1000 of go-juice... how much is t really likely to cost? THAT is the the first problem to tackle.


Wow that's a long reply, never expected to get this kind of response from my first forum post, it's nice to know some one other than my mum is worried about me! I really appreciate all the advice on bike maintenance as that's the main thing I've been researching recently BUT you have made a serious number of false assumptions about my preparation. I believe I will be able to do this trip, or at least get as far as I can! And every comment that I can't and won't be able to do it just fuels my ambition to do it.

So... I'll give you some background. I'm 23, finished my degree in aerospace engineering last summer and have been working as a builder's labourer since then to save up money (by the time I set off I will have around 10k saved up). I commute an hour to work each way which I do on my bike as much as possible to get the practice in. So far the biggest ride I've done is a 3 day trip to the lakes and back (about 130 miles each day) which included a 5 miles stretch on a green road in the dales. This was on a fully loaded 125 and we went past some guys in landrovers that were shocked to see us up there so it must have been pretty rough!

I've been planning a big motorcycle trip for a year now, long way round was a big inspiration but the main guy who inspired me was Ed from c90 adventures who rode a Honda c90 from Malaysia to the UK. His youtube videos made me believe that an overland trip is possible on whatever bike you like. I haven't read Jupiter travels but heard it mentioned a few times so I'm definitely going to read it soon.

I chose the cg125 because
(a) It's cheap to buy and insanely reliable
(b) It was built for the 3rd world market and has sold millions all over the world so spare parts will be easier to get hold of than almost any other bike
(c) It's lightweight so will handle off road well (just like claudio's bike in LWR)
(d) It's a simple design so almost any mechanic will know how to fix it
etc..

I'll be travelling through europe - georgia - azerbaijan - ferry to turkmenistan - uzbekistan - kyrgyzstan - kazakhstan - russia - mongolia - russia - ferry to japan. And yes I've done loads research of on visas and travel permits etc. One of the reasons LWD had trouble on the borders was the fact that they had were travelling as a camera crew and had lots of camera equipment.

My bike is a 2006 Honda cg 125 (front disc brake), 16000 miles and is in good condition but I'm currently spending my weekends going over different parts of the bike and will definitely do some, if not all, of the maintenance tips you mentioned.

Yes this trip would be easier if I had more experience but I felt like this trip may not ever happen if I don't go for it now, while I have the time before I start my career.
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Nobby the Bastard
World Chat Champion



Joined: 16 Aug 2013
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PostPosted: 21:09 - 12 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jesus h fucking christ. Teffception....
____________________
Pete:"One thing you can count on - if Pol's involved it's bound to go full Jeremy Kyle" Rogerborg:"I took Mrs Borg out for some naughty back alley action on my tiddler."
trevor saxe-coburg-gotha:"Remember this simple rule - scooters are for men who like to feel the breeze on their huge, flapping cunt lips."
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andyscooter
World Chat Champion



Joined: 30 May 2009
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PostPosted: 10:54 - 13 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

oh dear I caused a teffing Embarassed


sorry op
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ADSrox0r
World Chat Champion



Joined: 23 Oct 2012
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PostPosted: 12:31 - 13 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

bellx1 wrote:


Wow that's a long reply, never expected to get this kind of response from my first forum post, it's nice to know some one other than my mum is worried about me!


Sorry to burst your bubble but you could post a simple question asking what the weather is like outside and that you might go for a pootle on your 125 and Tef will leap into action posting a doctorate that could have answered your question in one sentence ie. 'It's raining'.
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Ste
Not Work Safe



Joined: 01 Sep 2002
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PostPosted: 12:59 - 13 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

The thing is, that post from Teffers is quite good as it contains loads of stuff which is helpful and is relevant to the OP.

The post stays on topic, there's no mention of Land Rovers and riding trials bikes is only mentioned twice in passing. Mr. Green

We all love to take the piss but that's a good wall of Teff. Wub
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neptune8
Nova Slayer



Joined: 22 Nov 2016
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PostPosted: 21:31 - 13 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

Going back to the OPs original question, fitting a chainguard to a 2006 model is not straightforward. The design changed several times over the years, in that the number and position of the mounting bolts changed over the years,and these bolts are tapped into threaded holes on the swinging arm. The easiest way would be to to change the swinging arm to an earlier one that will accommodate a chainguard, but there is no guarantee that there will not be other problems, for instance, the wheel hub width may be different, or the length and diameter of that part of the swinging arm that carries the bushes on which it pivots. IMO the totally enclosed chainguard was one of the best features of the CG, and it was a crime to discontinue it.
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Nobby the Bastard
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Joined: 16 Aug 2013
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PostPosted: 23:33 - 13 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

So, the easy solution would be to fit a scotoiler.

Teffers, would you like to provide instructions on how to fit?
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Pete:"One thing you can count on - if Pol's involved it's bound to go full Jeremy Kyle" Rogerborg:"I took Mrs Borg out for some naughty back alley action on my tiddler."
trevor saxe-coburg-gotha:"Remember this simple rule - scooters are for men who like to feel the breeze on their huge, flapping cunt lips."
Sprint 1050 ST
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Commuter_Tim
World Chat Champion



Joined: 09 May 2013
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PostPosted: 07:09 - 14 Jan 2018    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nobby the Bastard wrote:
Teffers, would you like to provide instructions on how to fit?

You fucker, it took me 4 years, but I just realised where you got your name from. Laughing
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