Resend my activation email : Register : Log in 
BCF: Bike Chat Forums


Pre-Purchase Checks on Bike - How Far Is Too Far?

Reply to topic
Bike Chat Forums Index -> New Bikers Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
View previous topic : View next topic  
Author Message

Falco
Spanner Monkey



Joined: 27 Nov 2015
Karma :

PostPosted: 01:34 - 05 Jan 2017    Post subject: Pre-Purchase Checks on Bike - How Far Is Too Far? Reply with quote

I am going to view and test ride a bike (ER5) tomorrow or Friday (hopefully) and I could do with some advice about checks before buying.

Specifically how far is it reasonable to go when checking over a bike? I'd expect to give it a close inspection with a pen light in the darker corners, I'd expect to be allowed to check battery voltage when at idle and when revving, chain sprockets and so forth. In short I'd expect to be checking everything that is easily accessible.

But how far is it reasonable to go? I don't want to be an unreasonable buyer ("tyre kicker" is the phrase I think), nor do I wish to start disassembling the bike, however I would like to see under the fairings, maybe even the top of the engine where the spark plugs and cable runs are. Unreasonable?

On a related note, the bike is on an eBay auction, is there anything to loose by offering to pay for it on the spot (assuming everything checks out)? Anyone ever sold on ebay? Would you have taken an offer 4-5 days before the end of the auction at considerably above what it currently sits at and close to what it will likely fetch?
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

M.C
World Chat Champion



Joined: 29 Sep 2015
Karma :

PostPosted: 01:46 - 05 Jan 2017    Post subject: Re: Pre-Purchase Checks on Bike - How Far Is Too Far? Reply with quote

Falco wrote:
I am going to view and test ride a bike (ER5)

I'll save you the trouble, it'll be crap.
____________________
Yamaha MT-03 (660)
Honda XR-125L

Street Trip'
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Falco
Spanner Monkey



Joined: 27 Nov 2015
Karma :

PostPosted: 01:56 - 05 Jan 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

Meh.

For an R6 it will be abysmal. For what it is (a dull, reliable and above all cheap, commuter) it will be about average...
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

NJD
World Chat Champion



Joined: 11 Mar 2015
Karma :

PostPosted: 02:12 - 05 Jan 2017    Post subject: Re: Pre-Purchase Checks on Bike - How Far Is Too Far? Reply with quote

RE Checks: Since you're going to be test riding the thing I'd turn up, make sure the tyre pressures are correct, hand over monies because "if you crash you buy" and then go for a spin. In whatever order you like. I'd expect that mechanical inspection when buying a bike is the biggest thing and anything else thereafter won't matter. You'll be able to tell if it is or isn't for you during the ride and also use the time to spot any niggles, if there are any and then make your mind up upon return as to if you want to buy or not.

I'd say the more checks you want to do the sooner I'd want the money. In truth it's a commuter hack not a used supercar, accept it for what it is and do jobs as and when they, if they do, need doing. As above if the engines in good nick once you've gone for a spin I fail to see what else there is to take your time over? Sure do the small checks: tyre tread depth, sprocket condition so on throughout the consumables. Parts should be readily available and cheap enough anyway so with an ER5 I can't see a job that could come back to bite you re costs, simple as bikes come I'd say.

..

Front forks: compressed and rebound to ensure no oil loss through seals. Ensure forks not pitted.

Exhaust: use flashlight to inspect the bit that goes directly into the engine as I found it the most manky on the ZR out of the entire system. Otherwise just eyeball and ensure isn't blowing (cup hands around it to check and you can feel it if it is while the bikes running).

Ride straight: find a quiet road while out and about and look down, take your hands of the bar and see if the bike goes to one side. I'm sure there's other methods.

..

Can't really think of anything else to say.

Turn up, as I've been advised in the past, with a wad of cash in hand and hopefully sellers eye will implode and you'll get a deal. Probably start of with an offer rather than the entire amount ie: keep x amount in one pocket and x amount in the other. "This is what I'd be happy to part with right here right now, you want it or not?" and so forth.
____________________
The big ol' lump.
C̶h̶o̶n̶g̶ ̶n̶o̶o̶d̶l̶e̶.̶
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Rogerborg
nimbA



Joined: 26 Oct 2010
Karma :

PostPosted: 10:25 - 05 Jan 2017    Post subject: Re: Pre-Purchase Checks on Bike - How Far Is Too Far? Reply with quote

Falco wrote:
an eBay auction

So, you're viewing it before bidding?

Falco wrote:
is there anything to loose by offering to pay for it on the spot

Nope, go for it. If you're expecting a test ride, then the seller will (if they have any sense) insist on the amount of cash in hand that they really want for the bike anyway. Ask this beforehand, don't assume that you'll be offered a test ride on the basis of your cheeky chappy attitude.

If you like it after riding it, ask if they're happy to just keep the money and you keep the keys. As a seller, I'd prefer real cash that's already in my hand over some fantasist bidding then (maybe) showing up and trying to haggle down from there.

If the seller knocks back your offer, or if their expectations exceed what you want to pay, don't write the bike off. Feel free to go home and then bid less, or to contact them again after the auction closes and see if they've been gypped by their "buyer".

Just keep a firm lid on what you're prepared to pay - don't overvalue the bike just because you've put time into inspecting it.
____________________
Biking is 1/20th as dangerous as horse riding.
GONE: HN125-8, LF-250B, GPz 305, GPZ 500S, Burgman 400 // RIDING: F650GS (800 twin), Royal Enfield Bullet Electra 500 AVL, Ninja 250R because racebike
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

wr6133
World Chat Champion



Joined: 31 Dec 2013
Karma :

PostPosted: 10:28 - 05 Jan 2017    Post subject: Re: Pre-Purchase Checks on Bike - How Far Is Too Far? Reply with quote

Falco wrote:

But how far is it reasonable to go? I don't want to be an unreasonable buyer ("tyre kicker" is the phrase I think), nor do I wish to start disassembling the bike, however I would like to see under the fairings, maybe even the top of the engine where the spark plugs and cable runs are. Unreasonable?


Anything that can be checked without removing bolts I'd say is fair game. If you get to the point where you want to actually unbolt shit then I'd think it's because the stuff you can see has left such a poor impression it's probably not worth buying.

If I'm looking to buy I'll usually check.

Overall cosmetics (gives an idea of how it's been cared for)
Tyres (Condition and level of tread)
Wheels (buckles,jam front between legs and rag handlebars about to test head bearings)
Discs and pads (meat on both, discs cost alot)
Rear shock (condition, bounce arse end to ensure works)
Forks (stanchions, bounce it up and down hard to ensure seals don't piss out)
Chain (another good indicator of sellers maintenance ability)
Oil Level
Exhaust (general condition)
Ensure bike is cold, start it. (listen for unwanted noises, exhaust blows, etc)
Check all lights.

Finally if seller allows, ride it, work up and down the box and try to give each gear a handful to make sure they don't jump out.


Falco wrote:

On a related note, the bike is on an eBay auction, is there anything to loose by offering to pay for it on the spot (assuming everything checks out)?


I bought my current GSXR while it was on an eBay auction. Made an (insultingly low) offer backed by pulling out a fat wad of banknotes and mentioning how unreliable eBay auctions can be. It worked....... try it, worst seller can say is no and then you can just bid on the auction if you still want it.
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Rogerborg
nimbA



Joined: 26 Oct 2010
Karma :

PostPosted: 12:21 - 05 Jan 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

For those wanting to gazump OP, presumably it's one of these two:

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm//262783937723

Looks honest enough, consumables seem fine, but a short MOT and I'd be concerned that the seller's factoring the full price of what he's spent on it into the reserve price and his expectations of what constitutes a TIEM WASTAR.

Also, it has a history of "fluctuation of brake effort", the notorious ER5 worn drum, which looked to have been bodged from a fail to an advisory in 2015. It passed in 2016 with no advisory, so I'd want to be sure that it actually had the drum sorted or replaced, rather than just taken in for a Mate's MOT.

Piece of wood, centre stand, get the rear clear in the air and feel for pulsing in the rear brake pedal. I'd walk away if there's any hint of it, or reduce my offer price substantially.


http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm//142233127982

It failed its MOT on a blown fork seal last year, which somehow got fixed on the same day. Perhaps by the testing garage who'd already got the seals in, but why come the mileage went up then? Bounce the forks thoroughly, check carefully for any sign of oil in case it was just wiped down and packed out with grease. Check again thoroughly after riding - I got stung by this on my Ninja, on seals that had ostensibly been replaced by a dealer (Jim Allan in Falkirk, welcome to my shitlist). Emptor needed to caveat harder.
____________________
Biking is 1/20th as dangerous as horse riding.
GONE: HN125-8, LF-250B, GPz 305, GPZ 500S, Burgman 400 // RIDING: F650GS (800 twin), Royal Enfield Bullet Electra 500 AVL, Ninja 250R because racebike
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Monkeypony
Could Be A Chat Bot



Joined: 21 Sep 2011
Karma :

PostPosted: 12:41 - 05 Jan 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

The chap who purchased my previous bike didn't even bother to start it!

Just pressed cash monies into my palm and loaded it onto his van.

Which led me to believe that either the gentleman was a loon, or I'd rather underestimated the market value of the bike!! Confused
____________________
Current bike - 2016 Aprilia RSV4 RF, 2003 Suzuki DRZ400
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Rogerborg
nimbA



Joined: 26 Oct 2010
Karma :

PostPosted: 12:59 - 05 Jan 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

Monkeypony wrote:
Just pressed cash monies into my palm and loaded it onto his van.

UK buyer or Elbonian? With the pound falling, I imagine that Nardo is back again to clear us out.
____________________
Biking is 1/20th as dangerous as horse riding.
GONE: HN125-8, LF-250B, GPz 305, GPZ 500S, Burgman 400 // RIDING: F650GS (800 twin), Royal Enfield Bullet Electra 500 AVL, Ninja 250R because racebike
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Monkeypony
Could Be A Chat Bot



Joined: 21 Sep 2011
Karma :

PostPosted: 13:07 - 05 Jan 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rogerborg wrote:
Monkeypony wrote:
Just pressed cash monies into my palm and loaded it onto his van.

UK buyer or Elbonian? With the pound falling, I imagine that Nardo is back again to clear us out.


UK Buyer.

I even offered him 50 off as I hadn't had time to put a new battery in due to him showing up a couple of hours early. He said not to worry about it... Confused
____________________
Current bike - 2016 Aprilia RSV4 RF, 2003 Suzuki DRZ400
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Falco
Spanner Monkey



Joined: 27 Nov 2015
Karma :

PostPosted: 13:09 - 05 Jan 2017    Post subject: Re: Pre-Purchase Checks on Bike - How Far Is Too Far? Reply with quote

wr6133 wrote:
Anything that can be checked without removing bolts I'd say is fair game. If you get to the point where you want to actually unbolt shit then I'd think it's because the stuff you can see has left such a poor impression it's probably not worth buying.

If I'm looking to buy I'll usually check.

Overall cosmetics (gives an idea of how it's been cared for)
Tyres (Condition and level of tread)
Wheels (buckles,jam front between legs and rag handlebars about to test head bearings)
Discs and pads (meat on both, discs cost alot)
Rear shock (condition, bounce arse end to ensure works)
Forks (stanchions, bounce it up and down hard to ensure seals don't piss out)
Chain (another good indicator of sellers maintenance ability)
Oil Level
Exhaust (general condition)
Ensure bike is cold, start it. (listen for unwanted noises, exhaust blows, etc)
Check all lights.

Finally if seller allows, ride it, work up and down the box and try to give each gear a handful to make sure they don't jump out.


Falco wrote:

On a related note, the bike is on an eBay auction, is there anything to loose by offering to pay for it on the spot (assuming everything checks out)?


I bought my current GSXR while it was on an eBay auction. Made an (insultingly low) offer backed by pulling out a fat wad of banknotes and mentioning how unreliable eBay auctions can be. It worked....... try it, worst seller can say is no and then you can just bid on the auction if you still want it.


NJD wrote:
RE Checks: Since you're going to be test riding the thing I'd turn up, make sure the tyre pressures are correct, hand over monies because "if you crash you buy" and then go for a spin. In whatever order you like. I'd expect that mechanical inspection when buying a bike is the biggest thing and anything else thereafter won't matter. You'll be able to tell if it is or isn't for you during the ride and also use the time to spot any niggles, if there are any and then make your mind up upon return as to if you want to buy or not.

I'd say the more checks you want to do the sooner I'd want the money. In truth it's a commuter hack not a used supercar, accept it for what it is and do jobs as and when they, if they do, need doing. As above if the engines in good nick once you've gone for a spin I fail to see what else there is to take your time over? Sure do the small checks: tyre tread depth, sprocket condition so on throughout the consumables. Parts should be readily available and cheap enough anyway so with an ER5 I can't see a job that could come back to bite you re costs, simple as bikes come I'd say.

..

Front forks: compressed and rebound to ensure no oil loss through seals. Ensure forks not pitted.

Exhaust: use flashlight to inspect the bit that goes directly into the engine as I found it the most manky on the ZR out of the entire system. Otherwise just eyeball and ensure isn't blowing (cup hands around it to check and you can feel it if it is while the bikes running).

Ride straight: find a quiet road while out and about and look down, take your hands of the bar and see if the bike goes to one side. I'm sure there's other methods.

..

Can't really think of anything else to say.

Turn up, as I've been advised in the past, with a wad of cash in hand and hopefully sellers eye will implode and you'll get a deal. Probably start of with an offer rather than the entire amount ie: keep x amount in one pocket and x amount in the other. "This is what I'd be happy to part with right here right now, you want it or not?" and so forth.


Cheers for the advice, I'm aiming not to get a bike with less work needing done to it than my last one, or at least, being aware of that when I buy it this time. Appreciate the reality check on the check list of what it is worth checking Thumbs Up

Rogerborg wrote:
Falco wrote:
an eBay auction

So, you're viewing it before bidding?

Falco wrote:
is there anything to loose by offering to pay for it on the spot

Nope, go for it. If you're expecting a test ride, then the seller will (if they have any sense) insist on the amount of cash in hand that they really want for the bike anyway. Ask this beforehand, don't assume that you'll be offered a test ride on the basis of your cheeky chappy attitude.

If you like it after riding it, ask if they're happy to just keep the money and you keep the keys. As a seller, I'd prefer real cash that's already in my hand over some fantasist bidding then (maybe) showing up and trying to haggle down from there.

If the seller knocks back your offer, or if their expectations exceed what you want to pay, don't write the bike off. Feel free to go home and then bid less, or to contact them again after the auction closes and see if they've been gypped by their "buyer".

Just keep a firm lid on what you're prepared to pay - don't overvalue the bike just because you've put time into inspecting it.


Yes on inspection before bidding, I'm not quite that naive.
Test ride has been provisionally agreed upon with 300 in hand, though seller claims he would rather have 600 but since it is such a pain getting that amount out just to put it back in if no sale, he will be happy to hold 300 and bona fides of insurance (purely for my convenience of course). Red flag?

Still waiting for final conformation of inspection/ride and an address to go to..... Evil or Very Mad

Rogerborg wrote:
For those wanting to gazump OP, presumably it's one of these two:

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm//262783937723

Looks honest enough, consumables seem fine, but a short MOT and I'd be concerned that the seller's factoring the full price of what he's spent on it into the reserve price and his expectations of what constitutes a TIEM WASTAR.

Also, it has a history of "fluctuation of brake effort", the notorious ER5 worn drum, which looked to have been bodged from a fail to an advisory in 2015. It passed in 2016 with no advisory, so I'd want to be sure that it actually had the drum sorted or replaced, rather than just taken in for a Mate's MOT.

Piece of wood, centre stand, get the rear clear in the air and feel for pulsing in the rear brake pedal. I'd walk away if there's any hint of it, or reduce my offer price substantially.


http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm//142233127982

It failed its MOT on a blown fork seal last year, which somehow got fixed on the same day. Perhaps by the testing garage who'd already got the seals in, but why come the mileage went up then? Bounce the forks thoroughly, check carefully for any sign of oil in case it was just wiped down and packed out with grease. Check again thoroughly after riding - I got stung by this on my Ninja, on seals that had ostensibly been replaced by a dealer (Jim Allan in Falkirk, welcome to my shitlist). Emptor needed to caveat harder.


I am agog! Roger's google-fu has failed?! I did look at the first one, but the seller didn't bother to respond at all, so that was that.

I was interested to learn you can check MOT histories. The one for the bike I am looking at makes an interesting read. For those wishing to check for themselves it can be found here (though I'll thank you not to "gazump" me).

In short: advisories for the last couple of years for "juddering brakes" both front and rear (though nothing at all this year), a fail for a low headlight (which I don't rate), bike mysteriously looses ~15K miles between 2011 and 2012. But the most interesting is the 2006 result where it failed thoroughly on a variety of things after acquiring close to 130K miles in one year and then immediately passed the same day Shocked . Fixed in garage on the day (they had all those parts?) or a bit suspicious?
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Rogerborg
nimbA



Joined: 26 Oct 2010
Karma :

PostPosted: 14:16 - 05 Jan 2017    Post subject: Re: Pre-Purchase Checks on Bike - How Far Is Too Far? Reply with quote

Falco wrote:
I am agog! Roger's google-fu has failed?!

Oh, an ER500. Wink

That one has polished up well, and has exactly the extras that I'd want.

The 2006 MOT is likely just have been a typo, even a courier probably won't have done 127,000 miles in a year. Those same-day fixes aren't suspicious, they're just electrics and bleeding the front brake.

That 2011 MOT mileage is a bit hooky though, and it's apparently done 0 (well, -0.8) miles since the last MOT - how did he get it home?

Even if the mileage is legit it's considerable, so approach with caution and judge on its actual condition - I'd want to check that "slightly juddering" rear brake, as above.

But that mileage will put some bidders off, so if it's cheap enough and still runs well, why not?
____________________
Biking is 1/20th as dangerous as horse riding.
GONE: HN125-8, LF-250B, GPz 305, GPZ 500S, Burgman 400 // RIDING: F650GS (800 twin), Royal Enfield Bullet Electra 500 AVL, Ninja 250R because racebike
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Falco
Spanner Monkey



Joined: 27 Nov 2015
Karma :

PostPosted: 14:34 - 05 Jan 2017    Post subject: Re: Pre-Purchase Checks on Bike - How Far Is Too Far? Reply with quote

Rogerborg wrote:
Falco wrote:
I am agog! Roger's google-fu has failed?!

Oh, an ER500. Wink

That one has polished up well, and has exactly the extras that I'd want.

The 2006 MOT is likely just have been a typo, even a courier probably won't have done 127,000 miles in a year. Those same-day fixes aren't suspicious, they're just electrics and bleeding the front brake.

That 2011 MOT mileage is a bit hooky though, and it's apparently done 0 (well, -0.8) miles since the last MOT - how did he get it home?

Even if the mileage is legit it's considerable, so approach with caution and judge on its actual condition - I'd want to check that "slightly juddering" rear brake, as above.

But that mileage will put some bidders off, so if it's cheap enough and still runs well, why not?


I noted that it is being sold by one of your (distant) compatriots. The 2006 millage did seem....excessive.
Just out of curiosity, why would that happen with the millage in 2011? new clocks? winding the clocks back?

I'd guess it went back in a van? But maybe I just want the guy to be on the level. As for the millage, it is high, but not high enough that I can't imagine it being in good shape if well cared for. We shall see what state it is in tomorrow.

Thanks for the advice (ib4 workshop thread "how do I stop my brakes from juddering")
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Rufous
Brolly Dolly



Joined: 07 Jul 2016
Karma :

PostPosted: 14:42 - 05 Jan 2017    Post subject: Re: Pre-Purchase Checks on Bike - How Far Is Too Far? Reply with quote

Falco wrote:

I was interested to learn you can check MOT histories. The one for the bike I am looking at makes an interesting read. For those wishing to check for themselves it can be found here (though I'll thank you not to "gazump" me).

In short: advisories for the last couple of years for "juddering brakes" both front and rear (though nothing at all this year), a fail for a low headlight (which I don't rate), bike mysteriously looses ~15K miles between 2011 and 2012. But the most interesting is the 2006 result where it failed thoroughly on a variety of things after acquiring close to 130K miles in one year and then immediately passed the same day Shocked . Fixed in garage on the day (they had all those parts?) or a bit suspicious?


It looks like the current owner has mostly been polishing it and not riding, while one or two of its previous owners has ridden it to hell and back. The mileage confuses me too. However, given the screen and the top box, I would say someone rode it a lot at some point. Check that the engine number matches the one on the V5C. Couriers used to swap them out instead of fixing or repairing them. I note that the engine has been sprayed black. How recently? What's that on the rear swingarm? Looks like something dripping down it. Is the owner so desperate to get rid of this bike that they've tarted it up just for the Ebay photos?

That mileage, even if genuine (which is doubtful, going by the MOT history) is excessive. And the bike is far too shiny.

I really don't like it. Odometer reading at time of MOT (July 2016): "49,721 miles". Current miles on clock in Ebay photo: "49720".

Go and ask the owner why he stopped one mile before he got to the MOT station to take all these photos of his bike in July last year.
____________________
Safety in numbers
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Rogerborg
nimbA



Joined: 26 Oct 2010
Karma :

PostPosted: 15:17 - 05 Jan 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

Insightful, but I honestly wouldn't bother to ask the owner any of the above, since lies only cheapen both parties. Just check the docs against the bike, and go by how it looks, sounds and rides.
____________________
Biking is 1/20th as dangerous as horse riding.
GONE: HN125-8, LF-250B, GPz 305, GPZ 500S, Burgman 400 // RIDING: F650GS (800 twin), Royal Enfield Bullet Electra 500 AVL, Ninja 250R because racebike
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

angryjonny
World Chat Champion



Joined: 01 Sep 2006
Karma :

PostPosted: 17:11 - 05 Jan 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's had a respray so it's probably been shiny side down at some point in it's life. Only to be expected for an entry/commuter bike of that age and mileage, I guess.

Tawny wrote:
Go and ask the owner why he stopped one mile before he got to the MOT station to take all these photos of his bike in July last year.

The length of the shadows in the photos suggests they *were* taken in the summer. That deciduous tree in photo 3 looks to be in leaf too. Old pics. It could be he's tried (unsuccessfully) to sell the bike before and the photos are from then. MOT station may be only a mile away.
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Rogerborg
nimbA



Joined: 26 Oct 2010
Karma :

PostPosted: 18:47 - 05 Jan 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

angryjonny wrote:
The length of the shadows in the photos suggests they *were* taken in the summer. That deciduous tree in photo 3 looks to be in leaf too.

Plus, if you zoom in:

http://i.imgur.com/I2EvWRh.png
____________________
Biking is 1/20th as dangerous as horse riding.
GONE: HN125-8, LF-250B, GPz 305, GPZ 500S, Burgman 400 // RIDING: F650GS (800 twin), Royal Enfield Bullet Electra 500 AVL, Ninja 250R because racebike
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Monkeypony
Could Be A Chat Bot



Joined: 21 Sep 2011
Karma :

PostPosted: 22:30 - 05 Jan 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rogerborg wrote:
angryjonny wrote:
The length of the shadows in the photos suggests they *were* taken in the summer. That deciduous tree in photo 3 looks to be in leaf too.

Plus, if you zoom in:

http://i.imgur.com/I2EvWRh.png


Laughing Brilliant!
____________________
Current bike - 2016 Aprilia RSV4 RF, 2003 Suzuki DRZ400
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Commuter_Tim
World Chat Champion



Joined: 09 May 2013
Karma :

PostPosted: 00:04 - 06 Jan 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rogerborg wrote:
angryjonny wrote:
The length of the shadows in the photos suggests they *were* taken in the summer. That deciduous tree in photo 3 looks to be in leaf too.

Plus, if you zoom in:

http://i.imgur.com/I2EvWRh.png


That's a nice bike for such a grassy knoll.
____________________
The above post is most likely nonsensical.

I ride a Bandit 600... badly.
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

M.C
World Chat Champion



Joined: 29 Sep 2015
Karma :

PostPosted: 00:23 - 06 Jan 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

Falco wrote:
For what it is (a dull, reliable and above all cheap, commuter) it will be about average...

No it's not even that Smile It manages to take something exciting (a motorbike) and make it utterly boring. Best case scenario's that you'll crash it (highly likely with its shocking brakes), which apart from being briefly exciting will mean you won't have to ride it any further.
____________________
Yamaha MT-03 (660)
Honda XR-125L

Street Trip'
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Rufous
Brolly Dolly



Joined: 07 Jul 2016
Karma :

PostPosted: 00:46 - 06 Jan 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

M.C wrote:
Falco wrote:
For what it is (a dull, reliable and above all cheap, commuter) it will be about average...

No it's not even that Smile It manages to take something exciting (a motorbike) and make it utterly boring. Best case scenario's that you'll crash it (highly likely with its shocking brakes), which apart from being briefly exciting will mean you won't have to ride it any further.


Can you explain a bit more about why you say this?
I have experience of an ER5 and of an XT660Z (which has the same engine as your bike). The ER5 was faster and more exciting on the road. The XT hit the rev limiter very early, and while I love that engine, I think the ER5/EX500 engine has a bit more balls, if you're willing to ride it to the limit (up to and above 10k RPM).

I would much rather have your bike than the ER5 though, any day. But that's for 2 reasons: 1) I think the ER5's engine is an obsolete, complicated and difficult to service design; 2) because of the soul of a single cylinder bike, and the fact that the Yam 660 is fuel injected.
____________________
Safety in numbers
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

M.C
World Chat Champion



Joined: 29 Sep 2015
Karma :

PostPosted: 01:25 - 06 Jan 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tawny wrote:
Can you explain a bit more about why you say this?

Sure, it was the first big bike I rode, and I found it utterly bland. It handles ok, the brakes are dire, worst of all it was just so soulless. As you're comparing it to the MT-03, they produce the same amount of power, the ER5 has an extra gear but I was still struggling to get much over 70 out of it. They're old bikes, I genuinely can't think of anything I'd rather not have.

In case you think it's inexperience that led to that conclusion, an experienced friend who had a GPZ for years, had similarly negative things to say about it... he said it was like a diesel Very Happy
____________________
Yamaha MT-03 (660)
Honda XR-125L

Street Trip'
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Rufous
Brolly Dolly



Joined: 07 Jul 2016
Karma :

PostPosted: 01:32 - 06 Jan 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

M.C wrote:
Tawny wrote:
Can you explain a bit more about why you say this?

Sure, it was the first big bike I rode, and I found it utterly bland. It handles ok, the brakes are dire, worst of all it was just so soulless. As you're comparing it to the MT-03, they produce the same amount of power, the ER5 has an extra gear but I was still struggling to get much over 70 out of it. They're old bikes, I genuinely can't think of anything I'd rather not have.


OK, fair enough. But it sounds like the one you rode was broken. The ER5 I rode pulled hard straight over 100 - so hard it was difficult to hold the bars. And the handling was absolute precision stuff around the bends. Not second-guessing you here. I'm not the biggest fan of that bike.

Quote:
In case you think it's inexperience that led to that conclusion, an experienced friend who had a GPZ for years (same engine obviously), had similarly negative things to say about it... he said it was like a diesel Very Happy


Not saying it was inexperience at all, but I was curious because you would be comparing it with your current bike, and the ER5 in normal tune, unrestricted, with clean and balanced carbs, massively outperforms the MT03. The big problem with the ER5 IMO is making it run as Kawasaki intended. Perhaps my impression of the ER5 differs from yours because I came from a CG125 to that bike, so I was happy to ride it to the limit everywhere.

The brakes ARE shocking, though. Then again, from CG to ER5, no real difference... Although from Bandit (my test bike) to ER5, the brakes are a death trap.
____________________
Safety in numbers
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

M.C
World Chat Champion



Joined: 29 Sep 2015
Karma :

PostPosted: 01:49 - 06 Jan 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well I rode two so maybe they were both broken? Smile Yeah the handling confused me, it felt alright but the bike didn't encourage you to do any exuberant cornering. I wouldn't agree it massively outperforms the 660 single, quite the opposite based on the ones I rode (maybe they were good when new).

On paper they're similar but coming from an XR125 (same engine as the CG), apart from the initial pull away it failed to do anything exciting or memorable. I also did my test on a Bandit and by comparison that was amazing.
____________________
Yamaha MT-03 (660)
Honda XR-125L

Street Trip'
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Rufous
Brolly Dolly



Joined: 07 Jul 2016
Karma :

PostPosted: 01:57 - 06 Jan 2017    Post subject: Reply with quote

M.C wrote:
Well I rode two so maybe they were both broken? Smile Yeah the handling confused me, it felt alright but the bike didn't encourage you to do any exuberant cornering. I wouldn't agree it massively outperforms the 660 single, quite the opposite (based on the ones I rode).

On paper they're similar but coming from an XR125 (same engine as the CG), apart from the initial pull away it failed to do anything exciting or memorable. I also did my test on a Bandit and by comparison that was amazing.


Yes, it's an odd coincidence. I rode an ER5 that worked as intended, and it was manic and unstoppable between 60 and 90 - really strong acceleration between those speeds, and strong acceleration above 90 (although it felt uncomfortable above that). Then again, I never took it out without exceeding 90mph. Every ride was an 'Italian tune-up', and it was really responsive through the throttle, although the cable broke once. An ER5 that works is... well, really good to ride. It should always fly past 100mph. On the other hand, I couldn't get the 660 Yamaha to go beyond 85 without really wringing its neck (to be fair it was a very high mileage hired bike). I would say the GPZ500S and ER5 have difficult to maintain engines... I'd be happy to strip down and rebuild a Yamaha single any day but not the EX500s.
____________________
Safety in numbers
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts
Display posts from previous:   

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Bike Chat Forums Index -> New Bikers All times are GMT + 1 Hour
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
Page 1 of 3

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You cannot download files in this forum

Read the Terms of Use! - Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group
 

Debug Mode: ON - Server: discovery (www) - Page Generation Time: 0.22 Sec - Server Load: 0.64 - MySQL Queries: 16 - CDN Objects: 53 - Page Size: 161.72 Kb