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Bikes for town and motorway?

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CorriganJ
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PostPosted: 13:08 - 14 Apr 2019    Post subject: Bikes for town and motorway? Reply with quote

Hey guys, I've booked my CBT, and plan to do my DAS after. I'm wondering what kind of bike to buy when I pass. I will be living in a city, and mostly taking short trips. So I want something upright, light and manouverable I guess.

But a few times a year I will also take very long trips. To be exact, next year riding Valencia to Madrid or Valencia to Barcelona and back maybe every 2 months?

After that I will be in the similar situation of living in a small town in Scotland, commuting a short distance to work, but roughly every 2 months making a roughly 350 mile journey to England for family events.

So I'm trying to think of a bike that can do both (although I will probably sell my Spanish bike before moving back and buy another in Scotland. But I have similar requirements in both cases anyway).

I love the look of the Yamaha SR 400 and 500... but a small underpowered unfaired bike would be awful for a 7-8 hour motorway trip, especially in the rain.

Conversely, taking a goldwing to the shops for a pint of milk is overkill.
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thx1138
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PostPosted: 13:49 - 14 Apr 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

Honda NC700x
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jnw010
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PostPosted: 14:09 - 14 Apr 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

350 miles. Full fairing.
I'd be kinda tempted by a Hayabusa or a Blackbird.
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leolion
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PostPosted: 15:57 - 14 Apr 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

tracer 700
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stinkwheel
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PostPosted: 16:44 - 14 Apr 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

Have a look at/sit on an ER6 or versys.

Or get two bikes. Get the SR you like the look/idea of for your short journeys and a speedbarge for the longer runs. You can pick up ZZR1100 and CBR1000Fs for sweetie money these days.
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Polarbear
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PostPosted: 18:22 - 14 Apr 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

^^^ SO agree with this^^^

There are a lot of big bikes for not too much money that would suit your long distance.

However if you are just after one bike, the ubiquitous Honda Deauville will fill both those roles.

Something more modern? ER6F or an adventure type 650.
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Kentol750
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PostPosted: 19:21 - 14 Apr 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fireblade.
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CorriganJ
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PostPosted: 22:29 - 14 Apr 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

2 bikes would be the dream. I've seen a lot of ST1300s cheap, although they look like crap...

I'm just not sure I have the cash for 2. This hobby is expensive. Would it be wise for a new rider to get on a zzr1100 though? I'm fairly sensible, but everyone says that until they end up underneath someone elses tyres.

I like the look of the older Goldwings, the 1100 and 1200 ones with the classic tube frame... would that be a more sensible bike than a zzr1100 for beginner? Still a huge bike, but (in my head) less likely to wheelie by accident, and (possibly?) lower centre of gravity, so easier to deal with the weight it has?
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linuxyeti
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PostPosted: 11:13 - 15 Apr 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

I too would go for 2 bikes. I have my CF650TR, for my motorway runs, and the weekly shop, loads of storage, and good weather protection, I have my Royal Enfield for more fun oriented riding, does have a top box as well though, for practicality, oh, and the ST7 for occasional use, if I feel like riding that style of bike.
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chickenstrip
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PostPosted: 11:31 - 15 Apr 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

Given the two very different kinds of riding you want a bike for, I'd also suggest two bikes as the best solution. Maybe a little 250/300 for those short town trips. Or even a 125.

So now we're just wanting the motorway/long trip bike. At least an effective top fairing, comfortable seat, not too cramped, luggage capacity(?), reliable.

I'd go for a litre+ of some description. Lazy power, not frantic. Sports bikes are out, not comfortable enough. A lot of "street" bikes are out, no fairing. I personally wouldn't consider a lot of Italian bikes, as I still don't trust their reliability - although maybe I'm behind the times with this? I'd be looking at Jap, probably IL4. Z1000SX?
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CorriganJ
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PostPosted: 11:58 - 15 Apr 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

chickenstrip wrote:
Given the two very different kinds of riding you want a bike for, I'd also suggest two bikes as the best solution. Maybe a little 250/300 for those short town trips. Or even a 125.

So now we're just wanting the motorway/long trip bike. At least an effective top fairing, comfortable seat, not too cramped, luggage capacity(?), reliable.

I'd go for a litre+ of some description. Lazy power, not frantic. Sports bikes are out, not comfortable enough. A lot of "street" bikes are out, no fairing. I personally wouldn't consider a lot of Italian bikes, as I still don't trust their reliability - although maybe I'm behind the times with this? I'd be looking at Jap, probably IL4. Z1000SX?


Quick note on commuting (especially in Scotland, but also generally) how do people keep clothes smart for professional environments? Folding shirts and suit trousers would crease them. Riding to work wearing them would be potentially dangerous. And worse, if cycling is anything to go by, one would end up with mud splattered up their trousers any time it rains?

My question, I suppose, is that my bike for short commutes to work, should it have a fairing to protect my clothes from the Scottish weather, or should I just accept that whatever I ride my riding gear will get filthy / wet in the winter and that i will need to change when I arrive?
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linuxyeti
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PostPosted: 12:00 - 15 Apr 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

If folding up isn't an option, then, it's a case over over clothes, although, they may well cause the clothes to crease as well. Can you keep some at work, hang them up to let the creases out?
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chickenstrip
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PostPosted: 12:39 - 15 Apr 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

CorriganJ wrote:

how do people keep clothes smart for professional environments?


You don't like to make things easy, do you? Laughing
If it were that important, I'd probably use my car.
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Evil Hans
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PostPosted: 13:09 - 15 Apr 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

CorriganJ wrote:
how do people keep clothes smart for professional environments? Folding shirts and suit trousers would crease them. Riding to work wearing them would be potentially dangerous. And worse, if cycling is anything to go by, one would end up with mud splattered up their trousers any time it rains?


I work in an office and commute by bike all year round.

In the winter I wear a textile jacket and overtrousers. I don't normally wear a suit-jacket, but on a couple of occasions when I've needed to I've worn it under my bike jacket.

In the summer I've got some Kevlar jeans that I can wear on their own or over smart trousers, and a vented summer-weight textile jacket. I carry some packable waterproofs in case of rain.

You really need somewhere where you can hang your dripping textiles on wet days, though.
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Polarbear
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PostPosted: 13:50 - 15 Apr 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

CorriganJ wrote:
2 bikes would be the dream. I've seen a lot of ST1300s cheap, although they look like crap...

I'm just not sure I have the cash for 2. This hobby is expensive. Would it be wise for a new rider to get on a zzr1100 though? I'm fairly sensible, but everyone says that until they end up underneath someone elses tyres.

I like the look of the older Goldwings, the 1100 and 1200 ones with the classic tube frame... would that be a more sensible bike than a zzr1100 for beginner? Still a huge bike, but (in my head) less likely to wheelie by accident, and (possibly?) lower centre of gravity, so easier to deal with the weight it has?


You have to want a Goldwing, not get one 'as it might suit me'.

I have had every model from the 1000 to the 1800 and love them. However I'm the first to admit they are not for everyone and need a very different riding mindset to some thing like a ZZR or FJ.

The 1000/1100/1200 4 cylinder models are of a real age now, basically vintage machinery and need to be treated as such.

The jump in real quality came with the 6 cylinder engines. The 1500 looks better, the 1800 is a better machine all round except in the looks department.

Bear in mind to change the rear tyre on a 1500 is an utter utter pig. It's a day job to dismantle everything - panniers, sub frame, bodywork. Over 150 parts have to be removed to remove the rear wheel.

The 1800, with single side swing arm and space to get the wheel out is the complete opposite.

However any 1800 in good nick commands a premium price irrespective of age.
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ThunderGuts
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PostPosted: 13:52 - 15 Apr 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are techniques that can work; I have cycled to work for years and occasionally motorcycle in too. The same principles apply;

- Shirts: if you place them on top of a (clean!) plastic bin liner and roll them up gently, they tend not to crease too much (i.e. there's little cotton on cotton contact, mostly cotton on plastic)

- Trousers: same as above, but if you're based out of the same office they'll only need to make this journey as frequently as you wash them - leave them at work overnight

- Suit jackets: these are bulky things generally and not the sort of thing that tends to be washed very frequently; I'd suggest taking in the car and leaving there. You could wear it under a textile jacket but you'd need a fair bit of room and you'd want to be wary of straining any of the seams in the suit jacket, e.g. as leaning forwards on the bike, moving the bike by hand etc.

In terms of bike, the fairly dull but capable NC750X would suit your requirements; economical, faired enough to give protection and a really useful storage bin which, other than any capacity limitations, is infinitely better than external luggage as it's low-ish and central on the bike. Or get two bikes . . .
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bhinso
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PostPosted: 14:10 - 15 Apr 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wat no Teffing?

Surprised
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CorriganJ
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PostPosted: 14:14 - 15 Apr 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

Polarbear wrote:
CorriganJ wrote:
2 bikes would be the dream. I've seen a lot of ST1300s cheap, although they look like crap...

I'm just not sure I have the cash for 2. This hobby is expensive. Would it be wise for a new rider to get on a zzr1100 though? I'm fairly sensible, but everyone says that until they end up underneath someone elses tyres.

I like the look of the older Goldwings, the 1100 and 1200 ones with the classic tube frame... would that be a more sensible bike than a zzr1100 for beginner? Still a huge bike, but (in my head) less likely to wheelie by accident, and (possibly?) lower centre of gravity, so easier to deal with the weight it has?


You have to want a Goldwing, not get one 'as it might suit me'.

I have had every model from the 1000 to the 1800 and love them. However I'm the first to admit they are not for everyone and need a very different riding mindset to some thing like a ZZR or FJ.

The 1000/1100/1200 4 cylinder models are of a real age now, basically vintage machinery and need to be treated as such.

The jump in real quality came with the 6 cylinder engines. The 1500 looks better, the 1800 is a better machine all round except in the looks department.

Bear in mind to change the rear tyre on a 1500 is an utter utter pig. It's a day job to dismantle everything - panniers, sub frame, bodywork. Over 150 parts have to be removed to remove the rear wheel.

The 1800, with single side swing arm and space to get the wheel out is the complete opposite.

However any 1800 in good nick commands a premium price irrespective of age.


I like what people have done to "cafe racer" the older goldwings. In the back of my mind, I would keep it "stock" for a few years as my motorway commuter. Then, at some point in the future, I could strip the plastics off and turn it into a fun weekend ride like this: http://bikeglam.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Cafe-Racer-Wrenchmonkees-Goldwing.jpg

But for this, it would have to be an older (GL1000 - GL1200) model as the new ones have unsuitable frames. The reality of owning a 40 year old bike for semi-regular 700 mile round trips might not be as good as the idea sounds Very Happy

As much as I would love one, it is possible that now is not the time to buy one Wink

Then again, if you think that a 1200 GL from the 80s would in fact still make a decent motorway monster, then I could pick one up cheap, ride it with panniers for 3, 4, 5 years, and one day absolutely ruin it (but have a lot of fun in the process!).
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Polarbear
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PostPosted: 15:43 - 15 Apr 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

CorriganJ wrote:

I like what people have done to "cafe racer" the older goldwings. In the back of my mind, I would keep it "stock" for a few years as my motorway commuter. Then, at some point in the future, I could strip the plastics off and turn it into a fun weekend ride like this: http://bikeglam.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Cafe-Racer-Wrenchmonkees-Goldwing.jpg

But for this, it would have to be an older (GL1000 - GL1200) model as the new ones have unsuitable frames. The reality of owning a 40 year old bike for semi-regular 700 mile round trips might not be as good as the idea sounds Very Happy

As much as I would love one, it is possible that now is not the time to buy one Wink

Then again, if you think that a 1200 GL from the 80s would in fact still make a decent motorway monster, then I could pick one up cheap, ride it with panniers for 3, 4, 5 years, and one day absolutely ruin it (but have a lot of fun in the process!).



This was my 1200 Interstate

https://i.postimg.cc/9XJd6452/1200-Interstate.jpg

It would be 36 years old now but sadly it doesn't look like it's going Crying or Very sad . Last MOT pass was 2015 at about 86000 miles.

I threw a lot of dosh at that bike, fcuked shock seals, carb issues and other things I can't remember. I doubt if I'd trust one across Europe without a lot of fettling and 5 star Euro recovery now.
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CorriganJ
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PostPosted: 01:01 - 16 Apr 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

Polarbear wrote:
CorriganJ wrote:

I like what people have done to "cafe racer" the older goldwings. In the back of my mind, I would keep it "stock" for a few years as my motorway commuter. Then, at some point in the future, I could strip the plastics off and turn it into a fun weekend ride like this: http://bikeglam.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Cafe-Racer-Wrenchmonkees-Goldwing.jpg

But for this, it would have to be an older (GL1000 - GL1200) model as the new ones have unsuitable frames. The reality of owning a 40 year old bike for semi-regular 700 mile round trips might not be as good as the idea sounds Very Happy

As much as I would love one, it is possible that now is not the time to buy one Wink

Then again, if you think that a 1200 GL from the 80s would in fact still make a decent motorway monster, then I could pick one up cheap, ride it with panniers for 3, 4, 5 years, and one day absolutely ruin it (but have a lot of fun in the process!).



This was my 1200 Interstate

https://i.postimg.cc/9XJd6452/1200-Interstate.jpg

It would be 36 years old now but sadly it doesn't look like it's going Crying or Very sad . Last MOT pass was 2015 at about 86000 miles.

I threw a lot of dosh at that bike, fcuked shock seals, carb issues and other things I can't remember. I doubt if I'd trust one across Europe without a lot of fettling and 5 star Euro recovery now.


Yeah see what I am hearing here is "expensive". There are nice looking GLs on ebay for £3k. But if I'm going to be constantly replacing bits that is going to get old fast!
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