Resend my activation email : Register : Log in 
BCF: Bike Chat Forums


Bad CBT Experience

Reply to topic
Bike Chat Forums Index -> New Bikers Goto page 1, 2  Next
View previous topic : View next topic  
Author Message

DexterKane
Derestricted Danger



Joined: 13 Aug 2019
Karma :

PostPosted: 15:32 - 13 Aug 2019    Post subject: Bad CBT Experience Reply with quote

Just got sent home from my CBT as the instructor didn't feel confident about letting me out on the road. TBF I wasn't much of a natural but I felt like the whole thing was so rushed I didn't get much of a chance to get the hang of it.

The other attendees either had biking experience or were riding peds so I felt like he just rushed through at their pace, while I was just expected to know what I was doing on the gears without having it explained in much detail. (Took me to near the end of the lesson to figure out that neutral is a half click for example).

I also really struggled with the throttle control, I'm 6.4 and felt like the handlebars were too close for my long arms, so found it hard not too wrap my hands too far round the throttle. My hands started aching after not long and it's still sore to type this.

We got on the bikes at around 10am, by 11.20 the others were sent to lunch. He gave me another 20 mins or so then hinted I should get a moped instead of a bike. As a tutor myself, I thought that was really poor practise. Suggesting someone should give up after less than 2 hours training at something is ridiculous. Obviously I told him I'd be back for another day, but am I right in thinking I should have been given a bit more time? Seems like a big ask to commit all that to muscle memory in less than 2 hours.
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

ThunderGuts
Spanner Monkey



Joined: 13 Nov 2018
Karma :

PostPosted: 16:15 - 13 Aug 2019    Post subject: Re: Bad CBT Experience Reply with quote

The road ride is the last bit, so you'd expect to be setting off around 1pm-2pm to do that bit. If you started at 9am (including the classroom and maintenance bits), then that's about the right amount of time to get everything else in. It is a little bit rushed as it's basically motorcycling in a tiny nutshell.

Size-wise it'll always be a problem; there are a few "large" 125s but they're not going to fit Mr/Mrs Average as easily (particularly for people who've never been on one before) so I doubt many, if any, schools will have them.

Contrary to popular belief, it isn't unheard of to be sent home from a CBT without the certificate - yes there is a fair bit to learn, some will get it more quickly than others (either through experience or natural ability, or a combination). Don't take it personally, just book yourself in again - perhaps emphasise when you do so the areas you were struggling with and they might be able to focus on those a bit more.

Out of interest, do you have a car licence? If not, I've always thought the CBT was a fair intake of knowledge for a day given you've got both the theory and practical elements to digest in a short time.
____________________
Rob
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Bhud
Crazy Courier



Joined: 11 Oct 2018
Karma :

PostPosted: 16:20 - 13 Aug 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

What you're saying is, if you were given a little more time, you may have got the hang of it. We don't know whether you're right about this, because we weren't there. Don't know whether you were wobbling around or just being dangerous, and you mention that your issue is gear shifting - a pretty fundamental thing to riding a bike. If you couldn't shift to neutral then you definitely shouldn't have been allowed on the road. However, you are sure you just needed a bit more time. The solution offered by the trainer was to give you more time by allowing you to return another day to pick up where you left it. You want more time and he's giving you more time, so there's no problem.

You also state that the other trainees picked it up quickly because they had had experience on peds. You then say that your trainer suggested you try peds. Again, I can't see the problem - the advice is surely sound if, as you say, experience on peds makes it easier to learn to ride a bike.
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

DexterKane
Derestricted Danger



Joined: 13 Aug 2019
Karma :

PostPosted: 16:26 - 13 Aug 2019    Post subject: Re: Bad CBT Experience Reply with quote

ThunderGuts wrote:


Out of interest, do you have a car licence? If not, I've always thought the CBT was a fair intake of knowledge for a day given you've got both the theory and practical elements to digest in a short time.


I've been driving near 20 years. Also had a ped for a year before that when was 16. It was entirely controlling the bike that was the problem. Perhaps being so used to driving a car made it harder. Pretty sure driving a ped gave me some really bad habits with the throttle. Felt like I was moving it millimetres but was still jerking all over the place.

Thanks for the advice Smile
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

DexterKane
Derestricted Danger



Joined: 13 Aug 2019
Karma :

PostPosted: 16:37 - 13 Aug 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

Bhud wrote:
What you're saying is, if you were given a little more time, you may have got the hang of it.


Actually I was asking if it's normal to have such a short time on the bike before moving on to the road part. Was expecting a lot more time to get to grips with it but now I know how much of a baptism of fire it is.

Bhud wrote:
You also state that the other trainees picked it up quickly because they had had experience on peds. You then say that your trainer suggested you try peds. Again, I can't see the problem - the advice is surely sound if, as you say, experience on peds makes it easier to learn to ride a bike.


No I said the other trainees either had experience on motorbikes or were doing their CBT on a ped. This put me well behind the rest of them in ability. It felt like he catered the CBT to the more able and I got left behind. At one point he looked surprised and said haven't been up to second yet? It was never explained or practised. I can ride a ped anyway I used to have one, it's piece of piss Smile
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Freddyfruitba...
World Chat Champion



Joined: 20 May 2016
Karma :

PostPosted: 16:39 - 13 Aug 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

No personal experience as I passed my test long before anybody ever thought of CBT. However, my lad is on the point of getting into riding (although he has a car license he has never ridden any form of powered two-wheeler), and he recently contacted a training centre to discuss options. The guy was very iffy about him just pitching up to do a CBT on that basis, and strongly reccomended that he came down to the centre for a bit of 1:1 training first, which he's probably going to do.

Sounds like you'd have been better off doing likewise?
____________________
KC100->CB100N->CB250RS--------->DL650AL2->R1200RS
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Bhud
Crazy Courier



Joined: 11 Oct 2018
Karma :

PostPosted: 19:30 - 13 Aug 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

DexterKane wrote:


No I said the other trainees either had experience on motorbikes or were doing their CBT on a ped. This put me well behind the rest of them in ability. It felt like he catered the CBT to the more able and I got left behind. At one point he looked surprised and said haven't been up to second yet? It was never explained or practised. I can ride a ped anyway I used to have one, it's piece of piss Smile


OK, fair enough.
There are a couple of things going on causing needless anxiety, and both are related to time. Time, as they say, waits for no man. You are a bit upset with yourself because you expected it all to click a lot faster, and you're wondering about whether the time allocated to training was sufficient. That's on a personal temporal cycle.

There is a wider, social temporal cycle as well. As it's the middle of summer, there were probably a lot of trainees there, making time management a priority for the trainers. This meant a less intimate training experience. Accompanying this, there are now 5 stages to a CBT and less scope for a trainer to tailor a CBT to the trainee than there once was.

On an even wider temporal cycle, there is the added awkwardness of the world we live in today, combined with us being in the sunset period of ICE motorbikes. When I did my CBT in the 1990s, the trainers were a distinct type - easygoing, sociable, very confident people with keen social awareness and appearing to be, generally, very competent men, and to all intents and purposes "biker bikers". People who would make crass jokes, swear, insult, etc. but it was all banter. Not really "professional" as such. Today, few motorcycle riders fit this mould, trainers are no exception, and those that do have a more pessimistic bent and are generally less open in their dealings with people. At the same time, social skills and awareness of others have taken several steps back, in the age of smartphones and screens. This means misunderstandings are more possible, it's all less personal and it becomes about good/bad "customer service" whereas in the past it felt like starting a journey/making friends.

Time takes its own time, unfortunately. I think you're putting pressure on yourself and it isn't helping. Take as many goes as you like until you get it.
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Riejufixing
World Chat Champion



Joined: 24 Jun 2018
Karma :

PostPosted: 19:55 - 13 Aug 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

What were you riding?

Do you live in a rural area or in a busy town?
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

DexterKane
Derestricted Danger



Joined: 13 Aug 2019
Karma :

PostPosted: 19:58 - 13 Aug 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

Riejufixing wrote:
What were you riding?

Do you live in a rural area or in a busy town?


The training centre classic Honda CG125.

I live in South London. It's definitely not rural Smile
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Riejufixing
World Chat Champion



Joined: 24 Jun 2018
Karma :

PostPosted: 20:17 - 13 Aug 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

DexterKane wrote:
Riejufixing wrote:
What were you riding?

Do you live in a rural area or in a busy town?


The training centre classic Honda CG125.

I live in South London. It's definitely not rural Smile

Oh dear. I was going to suggest doing your CBT on an automatic, then after you've got it practicing with your geared thing on quiet roads.

If gears are the issue, talk to the (different? Maybe, maybe not, depends on whether you got on well with them) CBT people BEFORE you book, and tell them what's up. You might be able to get a sort-of tailored experience, if the firm's any good they should be reasonably flexible, and they will know what the problem is because you will tell them.

As you've been driving a car for a while, you have (I hope!) an advantage over the completely "green" novice (unless you've always driven an auto). So it's just gears, and associated control. You know(with the proviso above) about the clutch and how it all works in a car, it's just the difference with a bike, which might, I don't know, have seemed like a bit of a beast on first ride.

So you're big for the bike. That should not matter, really, unless it's so small you're very uncomfortable in the seated position. You don't need to grip the throttle like grim death, see it you can relax a bit. You just need a bit more practice, and DON'T PANIC!
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Easy-X
World Chat Champion



Joined: 08 Mar 2019
Karma :

PostPosted: 20:58 - 13 Aug 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

Same here: 20 years or so of driving. Luckily I did my CBT in the middle of winter so it was just me and a guy doing his fourth Shocked cert renewal so basically it was just me in the afternoon.

I suspect I was at the same level as you @ 9am. Even my instructor said it was like night and day between starting and finishing... I doubt I'd achieve so much with a load of other students huffing and clicking their teeth waiting for the n00b to catch up.

I recommend Twickenham Motorcycle Training where I did my Mod 1 & 2. if that's not too far out of your way. They are still the aforementioned "biker bikers" of old Smile You can pay them a tenner and they'll give you a quick, half hour assessment on the bike of your choosing (ped, 125, etc.) which seems like a fair deal. If you don't like their style you've only wasted a few quid!
____________________
Yamaha DT175 (WIP) Honda Rebel, Suzuki SV650 (loan) Fazer 600, Keeway Superlight 125, 50cc turd scooter,
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Easy-X
World Chat Champion



Joined: 08 Mar 2019
Karma :

PostPosted: 21:08 - 13 Aug 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, and with regards to controlling the bike... yes, there's a fair bit going on! Pretty much every limb working simultaneously - there is an art to it that is worth chasing for.

The thing to consider, at low speed, is the throttle and clutch work in tandem: get some revs going with the clutch in and then control the speed of the bike with just by easing the clutch in and out otherwise it's boing, boing, kangaroo time Smile Think the bike's stalling? A little more throttle. Engine screaming? Ease off a little. Going too fast? Dab the back brake. Yes, a bit overwhelming on the first pass.

You should really master the slow manoeuvring before even tackling changing up to second or third.

With regards to the game of "hunt the neutral" while it is shocking that this wasn't explained to you I have to counter that there is this thing called the Internet and there are egos aplenty on YouTube falling over themselves to explain how bikes work in excruciating detail. A little bit of homework beforehand might have helped.
____________________
Yamaha DT175 (WIP) Honda Rebel, Suzuki SV650 (loan) Fazer 600, Keeway Superlight 125, 50cc turd scooter,
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

DexterKane
Derestricted Danger



Joined: 13 Aug 2019
Karma :

PostPosted: 21:17 - 13 Aug 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

Easy-X wrote:
Oh, and with regards to controlling the bike... yes, there's a fair bit going on! Pretty much every limb working simultaneously - there is an art to it that is worth chasing for.

The thing to consider, at low speed, is the throttle and clutch work in tandem: get some revs going with the clutch in and then control the speed of the bike with just by easing the clutch in and out otherwise it's boing, boing, kangaroo time Smile Think the bike's stalling? A little more throttle. Engine screaming? Ease off a little. Going too fast? Dab the back brake. Yes, a bit overwhelming on the first pass.

You should really master the slow manoeuvring before even tackling changing up to second or third.

With regards to the game of "hunt the neutral" while it is shocking that this wasn't explained to you I have to counter that there is this thing called the Internet and there are egos aplenty on YouTube falling over themselves to explain how bikes work in excruciating detail. A little bit of homework beforehand might have helped.


I actually nailed the slow moving bit, but we only spent about 15 mins on that including the figure of 8. It was putting it all together with the gears that was the problem.

He just seemed to to skip the gears lesson altogether as everyone else didn't need it.

I had done a bit of youtubing but I'm on of those people who learn by doing, not watching or reading about it.
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

GSTEEL32
Crazy Courier



Joined: 24 Feb 2010
Karma :

PostPosted: 21:44 - 13 Aug 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

Personally, I think you've got the wrong end of the stick.

This guy has said you're sh!t with gears. You are. You admit it yourself.

This guy is signing off that you can manage f*ck off buses, trucks and commuters on a geared bike on public roads.

Which you can not.

He suggested a ped as you have 20 years driving experience.

What's so wrong with that?

He's saving you getting your head wedged under a night bus because you were fannying around looking for 2nd rather than a junction.

Get the CBT passed. Buy a geared bike. Spend 2 weekends going up and down a private path and you'll be job done.

YouTube will definitely not help in this instance, only physical practice.
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail You must be logged in to rate posts

DexterKane
Derestricted Danger



Joined: 13 Aug 2019
Karma :

PostPosted: 22:00 - 13 Aug 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

GSTEEL32 wrote:
Personally, I think you've got the wrong end of the stick.

This guy has said you're sh!t with gears. You are. You admit it yourself.

This guy is signing off that you can manage f*ck off buses, trucks and commuters on a geared bike on public roads.

Which you can not.

He suggested a ped as you have 20 years driving experience.

What's so wrong with that?

He's saving you getting your head wedged under a night bus because you were fannying around looking for 2nd rather than a junction.

Get the CBT passed. Buy a geared bike. Spend 2 weekends going up and down a private path and you'll be job done.

YouTube will definitely not help in this instance, only physical practice.



Actually in many ways ways you have got the wrong end of the stick. I didn't disagree with his assessment. I needed a little more time for sure.

I felt however that he could have explained things better, and wanted to find out if it's normal to spend less that 2 hours learning how to ride the bike. It felt massively rushed to me. I was out of there before midday, just as I was getting into it. As a teacher myself I wouldn't expect anyone to be competent at anything in that time.

I came there to learn a motorbike not be told to give up at the first hurdle. Sorry but that's absolutely terrible teaching practice. I can ride a ped already. I'm sure some less determined people would have given up after being told that. It's not that he told me to ride a ped it's that he suggested I should give up riding because it didn't instantly click.
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

GSTEEL32
Crazy Courier



Joined: 24 Feb 2010
Karma :

PostPosted: 22:17 - 13 Aug 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

As a teacher, do you think you were prepared enough for CBT?

Did you not read through a quick syllabus of an average CBT, to ensure you could keep up ?

You seem like an intelligent fella, suck up the day's training, put it down to experience and have another go.
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail You must be logged in to rate posts

DexterKane
Derestricted Danger



Joined: 13 Aug 2019
Karma :

PostPosted: 22:27 - 13 Aug 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

GSTEEL32 wrote:
As a teacher, do you think you were prepared enough for CBT?

Did you not read through a quick syllabus of an average CBT, to ensure you could keep up ?

You seem like an intelligent fella, suck up the day's training, put it down to experience and have another go.


It would have nice to been more prepared, but ultimately as you said, without being able to legally ride bike there wasn't that much I could have done. Was expecting 8 hours of training if I needed it, not 2.

Thank you! I'll deffo be back. I believe in most case anyone can lean anything with enough practise Smile
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Ste
Not Work Safe



Joined: 01 Sep 2002
Karma :

PostPosted: 23:53 - 13 Aug 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

Phone around other CBT places in your area and explain how your attempt went and how you think they were rushing through everything without enough time for you to pick it all up as the other people were on scooters or were just renewing their CBT.

You'll find somewhere that is very disapproving of how the first place expected you to rush through everything and they'll offer you something where the day is for people who're new to geared bikes so things will go at a sensible pace.

Of course you'll have the advantage of having more of an idea of what to do than everyone else who's new to geared bikes so that should take some of the pressure off. Laughing

As you're going to be getting a geared bike, you want to be learning the very basics on a CBT schools bike rather than your own. Plus it makes sense to do the compulsory basic training on a geared bike as that's what you're planning on riding. Laughing
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Sister Sledge
World Chat Champion



Joined: 17 Aug 2018
Karma :

PostPosted: 06:25 - 14 Aug 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

Look I'm a noob when it comes to CBT. I did my test in the B&W days..
If you do the CBT on a ped does that mean you can only ride a ped the rest of your life? What I'm trying to say is CBT on a ped and Once through that find a geared bike to actually learn on?? (obviously somewhere private and safe)
Surely that's the answer here?
CBT by the sounds of it is simply a quick introduction to bikes and the roads? It's not a whole day of practice with gears and throttle control.
(I could also be very wrong)
____________________
CCM 404 DS
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

linuxyeti
World Chat Champion



Joined: 06 Oct 2006
Karma :

PostPosted: 06:51 - 14 Aug 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

DexterKane wrote:


......
As a teacher myself

.....


Welcome to streamlining, you were with a group of 'students' who, were already at a higher level than you, you were given the option to join that higher level, by changing your way of 'work', going to auto rather than geared, which you refused. So, rather than hold the rest of the class back, you were dropped down a set, figuratively speaking.

CBT is the absolute minimum amount of training that can be given before you're deemed safe enough to continue to learn (L plates) to ride a bike on your own going forward. As others have said, get your cbt on an auto, once you have gained your certificate (note, not passed) get yourself a geared bike, find some quiet places to practice on, and learn how to ride a geared bike in your own time and at your own pace.
____________________
Current rides :- Hyosung ST7, Royal Enfield 650 Interceptor, F.B Mondial HPS 125
Previously owned bikes :- Chituma CTM-125, Jinlun JL250-5, Honda VTX1300, Suzuki GS500, Lifan LF400, Lexmoto Arrow 125, Yamaha XJ600 Diversion,Triumph America, Skyteam ST-125 V-Raptor, Royal Enfield 350 Bullet, Mash 400 Roadstar & Honley RX3 Venturer (Zhongshen RX3),CFMoto CF650TR,
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

pinkyfloyd
Super Spammer



Joined: 20 Jul 2010
Karma :

PostPosted: 06:56 - 14 Aug 2019    Post subject: Re: Bad CBT Experience Reply with quote

DexterKane wrote:
Just got sent home from my CBT as the instructor didn't feel confident about letting me out on the road. TBF I wasn't much of a natural but I felt like the whole thing was so rushed I didn't get much of a chance to get the hang of it.


The CBT is a very busy and pretty rushed day with a lot of info to take in in a short period of time but while most people do get through it on a day some take longer, this should have been explained at the start. There is no set in stone time frame for completing a CBT.

DexterKane wrote:
The other attendees either had biking experience or were riding peds so I felt like he just rushed through at their pace, while I was just expected to know what I was doing on the gears without having it explained in much detail. (Took me to near the end of the lesson to figure out that neutral is a half click for example).

The CBT should always run at the speed of the slowest player. If the others had more riding experience then he could easily have sent them riding around and kept an eye on them while focusing on you. Not spotting the gear error or correcting it sounds like bad instructing it is one of the most basic things to spot.

DexterKane wrote:
I also really struggled with the throttle control, I'm 6.4 and felt like the handlebars were too close for my long arms, so found it hard not too wrap my hands too far round the throttle. My hands started aching after not long and it's still sore to type this.

Again your instructor should have spotted the gripping on too tightly. There is not a lot that can be done about the bike being too small for you, many of the 125cc bikes are small and schools tend to buy generic ones that are cheap to fix for when they get dropped and of a size that fit everyone.

DexterKane wrote:
We got on the bikes at around 10am, by 11.20 the others were sent to lunch. He gave me another 20 mins or so then hinted I should get a moped instead of a bike. As a tutor myself, I thought that was really poor practise. Suggesting someone should give up after less than 2 hours training at something is ridiculous. Obviously I told him I'd be back for another day, but am I right in thinking I should have been given a bit more time? Seems like a big ask to commit all that to muscle memory in less than 2 hours.


The option of a ped is a valid one as I have had students get through gearing but then fall to bits on junction work so placing them on a ped can get them through a CBT. After which they can still ride a geared 125 on their CBT.

Sounds like you have had a bad experience, whether its shoddy instructing or you just could not get to grips with how bikes ride, they are more responsive than cars, they are vastly different and not everyone is cut out for riding, regardless of how much they want to do it.

I would recommend trying a different school but tell them when you book about your previous issue and how it went with the last school. If you were not so far away from me I would invite you to come down to my school and I would do my best to get you through it.

If you need any advice, have any questions you are welcome to message me and I'll happily chat to you.
____________________
illuminateTHEmind wrote: I am just more evolved than most of you guys... this allows me to pick of things quickly which would have normally taken the common man years to master
Hockeystorm65:.well there are childish arguments...there are very childish arguments.....there are really stupid childish arguments and now there are......Pinkfloyd arguments!
Teflon-Mike:I think I agree with just about all Pinky has said.
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website You must be logged in to rate posts

Teflon-Mike
tl;dr



Joined: 01 Jun 2010
Karma :

PostPosted: 07:34 - 14 Aug 2019    Post subject: Re: Bad CBT Experience Reply with quote

DexterKane wrote:
but am I right in thinking I should have been given a bit more time? .

And therein, I think, lies the nub of the matrter... 'given'....
ER.. no, if you wanted something 'more' then 'standard' why shouylod you be 'given' it? Its like buying a Skoda then complaining it don't have Wilton carpet like a Rolls Royce, and because you dont have any slippers, just a pair of sandals, you should be 'given' a Wilton carpet?!?!?!? Eh?

Lets back up a bit here. You booked on a bog standadard CBT course.... it is NOT guaranteed that every one will 'complete to satisfactory standard' in a day... there is number one problem, NOT with the school or the course but YOUR expectations... You pay money for a course you exepected to get the DL196 for it, in the day, like walking into Mc Donalds and ordering a big-muck!!!

No.. you paid for a course of training... you got that.. if you didn't learn in the time you paid for why do you think you should be 'given' anything extra for free?

If you is slow learner and need extra training.. why should you NOT expect to pay for it?

And you have now proved to yourself you are not a fast learner, and you do need extra, and more, extra 1:1 time, not time in group holding back the group....

Your Car driving history is a red-herring. So is your height. So is all the otyher chaff you are trying to chuck in the mix as excuse why
YOU are special snowflake and should be 'Given' special tailo made treatment when you have pad primark off the peg prices....

DEEP breath.... take a bit of a hit on the chin.,..... start over... and NO you should NOT be 'given' effall.. you should expect to PAY for what you want.....

Start by getting expectations in line with reality, stop presuming on irrelevent umpety years car driving and once havibng ridden a ped....

BTW a ped is a MO-PED, legally a powered two wheeler under 50cc and not capable of more than 28mph.. it does not have to be a scooter, it does not have to be a twist and go.... it can be geared or automatic, and any style you want, be that a step through, a scooter, or a motorcycle, and that a dirt bike, road-bike, sports-bike or chopper... sobe clear what you arte talking about here, T&G scooter or 50cc slo-ped?

You obviously struggled... but fact you have come on here aafter, indignant that YOU know better than teacher so teacher must be wrong,.... SORT of suggests that that is the big issue and you have NOT learned, cos your tea cup runneth over grashoppa..... you have been convinced how much you know before you started and NOT been responsive to being taught anything.... so when you haven't it must be teachers fault, 'cos it cant possibly be yours, you know it all already, dont you?

Get youir head in the right place. Dont expect a free lunch or anyone to 'give' you anything you haven't paid for. Stop teying to kid yourself you know better than teacher and fighting them, try listening and actually learnbing and NOT making bludy excuses... and try again.... and if you STILL need more 1:1 then be prepared to pay for it, and bppk some 1:1 lessons for that extra you reckon you need and hope to be given'.

Itrs up to you,,, its boit a free lunch and no one has to 'give' you effall... all do=wn to your expecations and aproach...... and if any0ine needs change anything... think long and hard who that should be....
____________________
My Webby'Tef's-tQ, loads of stuff about my bikes, my Land-Rovers, and the stuff I do with them!
Current Bikes:'Honda VF1000F' ;'CB750F2N' ;'CB125TD ( 6 3 of em!)'; 'Montesa Cota 248'. Learner FAQ's:= 'U want to Ride a Motorbike! Where Do U start?'
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website You must be logged in to rate posts

Riejufixing
World Chat Champion



Joined: 24 Jun 2018
Karma :

PostPosted: 07:47 - 14 Aug 2019    Post subject: Re: Bad CBT Experience Reply with quote

Teflon-Mike wrote:
DexterKane wrote:
but am I right in thinking I should have been given a bit more time? .

And therein, I think, lies the nub of the matrter... 'given'....
ER.. no, if you wanted something 'more' then 'standard' why shouylod you be 'given' it?

FCS I hate it when people take a well-known figure of speech and twist it through either ignorance or desire.
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

Ribenapigeon
World Chat Champion



Joined: 20 Feb 2012
Karma :

PostPosted: 08:18 - 14 Aug 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dont put pressure on yourself. If you think the attitude of the instructor was a bit iffy then as others have said book with another outfit. To be fair though, imagine the responsibility an instructor has taking someone on the road, he probably thought better safe than sorry.

On a lighter note, when I did my CBT i just could not do a Uturn, it transpired being 6'2" my knee was stopping me turning the bars enough. So at 6'4" good luck with your Uturns.
Keep at it.
____________________
My socks are on fire!
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts

trevor saxe-coburg-gotha
World Chat Champion



Joined: 22 Nov 2012
Karma :

PostPosted: 09:01 - 14 Aug 2019    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I did mine a few years ago I felt a massive amount of pressure, which'll probably be an even more common experience since the "recent" two-year compulsory renewal of CBT for continual 125cc riders (who don't have a full license). I mention this because one of the psychological stresses I felt was a result of holding others up. The five of us were at very different stages - a couple had obviously ridden before, and had good-to-excellent machine control, and loads of familiarity with bikes. Me and this other kid basically sucked.

I was so fucking relieved when, that afternoon, the instructor said us two couldn't go on the road ride. In fact, I would've refused anyway. The other guy was gutted though - even when I tried to tell him it was probably for the best anyway. It did feel like we'd failed - but if we'd all of us been starting from a similar place, I'm pretty sure none of us would've gone out.

Five is a big group for one instructor, especially when everyone's starting on a different level.

In the end, I had to go back on another day - and that's when I sussed it. Quite quickly, as it happened. This time it was one-to-one - and when I went out on the road after a few hours in the compound, it was fine and I had no dramas or owt.

But it's all a bit heavy at times and I don't envy the instructors having to contend with groups of different levels and not much time.
____________________
"Life is a sexually transmitted disease and the mortality rate is one hundred percent."

Mobylette Type 50 ---> Raleigh Grifter ---> Neval Minsk 125
 Back to top
View user's profile Send private message You must be logged in to rate posts
Display posts from previous:   

Post new topic   Reply to topic    Bike Chat Forums Index -> New Bikers All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You cannot download files in this forum

Read the Terms of Use! - Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group
 

Debug Mode: ON - Server: enterprise (www) - Page Generation Time: 0.21 Sec - Server Load: 2.37 - MySQL Queries: 16 - CDN Objects: 48 - Page Size: 153.62 Kb