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BenR
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PostPosted: 16:32 - 02 Apr 2021    Post subject: Guitar measurements? Reply with quote

Hi all just wondering if any of you have a gibson Les Paul or a twin humbucker electric guitar? I was wondering if you wouldn't mind supplying me with a measurement of space between the pickups please? All the diagrams I've found via google give you every measurement but that one. Cheers in advance.
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Islander
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PostPosted: 16:47 - 02 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

65mm between pickup body edges. Thumbs Up
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BenR
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PostPosted: 18:03 - 02 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks very much. Thumbs Up
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MCN
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PostPosted: 20:35 - 02 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

BCF Delivers. Wub

(Fck Wikipedia.)
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Suntan Sid
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PostPosted: 20:55 - 07 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

For a comparison, according to the SG plans I have in front of me.
The distance between the Centre lines of the pickups = 88.2mm.
The distance between the opposing faces of the two pickups is 49.7mm.
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chickenstrip
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PostPosted: 20:59 - 07 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

Suntan Sid wrote:
For a comparison, according to the SG plans I have in front of me.


You making one of these now?
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Suntan Sid
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PostPosted: 12:52 - 08 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

chickenstrip wrote:
Suntan Sid wrote:
For a comparison, according to the SG plans I have in front of me.


You making one of these now?


I certainly am, I've also just started a short scale bass, of my own design!

Ufortunately I can't get the right aspect ratio on the images, but you'll get the idea
Here's the SG body, at first stage of staining, it's a lot redder in real life.
The neck is complete, bar the last three frets, which I can't install until the necks glued in.
https://i.imgur.com/RFkjZwc.jpeg

Template for short scale bass, ian an Ibanez stylee:-
https://i.imgur.com/n4usenJ.jpeg

better images here:-
https://imgur.com/gallery/UZmIvAo
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chickenstrip
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PostPosted: 12:59 - 08 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

^ Needs a super cool rating.
What have you found to be the hardest/most challenging thing about building guitars so far?
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Suntan Sid
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PostPosted: 14:41 - 08 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

chickenstrip wrote:
^ Needs a super cool rating.
What have you found to be the hardest/most challenging thing about building guitars so far?


The hardest thing, AFAIC, is achieving the accuracy required.
If you're building a set of shelves a few mm out isn't going to make a lot of difference. However with a guitar your margin for error is probably around +/- 0.25mm, so constant measuring before any cutting or shaping.
If you can achieve the accuracy required everything else falls in to place relatively easily.

I find making the neck the most rewarding!

The most challenging thing for me has been, in my current location, I have no workshop, no bench in fact there isn't a flat surface in the whole property. I also have no large machines, I do have access to a bandsaw, which is great, the same friend also has a jointer, I did use it once and decided I could get a better result with a hand plane.

The other thing, at the moment, is getting hold of wood, the SG is made out of some old garden furniture,(iroko), and a sheesham wood CD rack. I was lucky enough to get a big piece of mahogan for the neck.

The bass template is made out of some old deck chairs someone had chucked out, I think it's birch.
I really need some maple for the bass neck, which might be difficult to find.
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chickenstrip
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PostPosted: 15:25 - 08 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

Suntan Sid wrote:


The most challenging thing for me has been, in my current location, I have no workshop, no bench in fact there isn't a flat surface in the whole property. I also have no large machines, I do have access to a bandsaw, which is great, the same friend also has a jointer, I did use it once and decided I could get a better result with a hand plane.

The other thing, at the moment, is getting hold of wood, the SG is made out of some old garden furniture,(iroko), and a sheesham wood CD rack. I was lucky enough to get a big piece of mahogan for the neck.

The bass template is made out of some old deck chairs someone had chucked out, I think it's birch.


That leaves me a bit gobsmacked tbh.
It makes it even cooler that you're managing in this way, with such limited resources and facilities, and yet it hasn't put you off cracking on with it, and seem to be achieving your goals anyway, which are probably better than I'd manage with a workshop and an endless supply of choice materials!
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Suntan Sid
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PostPosted: 15:43 - 08 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

Limited tools and facilities does make things a challenge, but it forces you to think of other solutions.

First thing I did was scrounged two pies of kitchen work top and built my self a router sled to flatten slabs of wood.
I managed to bag an original B&D workmate for 30 euros which was great for holding the neck when I was shaping it.
I've made a few other tools along the way, a radius sanding block for the fret board, I'll have to make another for the bass, different fret board radius. I made a standalone disc sander out of the remains of an old band saw, a marking gauge, set squares, and an angled file holder for edging frets, from the remains of the garden furniture.

Something to keep me sane during this interminable lock down!
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Tracey Suntan-King
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PostPosted: 16:36 - 08 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

Limited facilities is a definite understatement. This is where Sid works,

https://i.imgur.com/OgaeTqG.jpg
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chickenstrip
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PostPosted: 17:09 - 08 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

Any plans for sorting out a proper workshop/work space? Is it just that you're stuck where you wouldn't usually be doing it due to lockdown?
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Tracey Suntan-King
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PostPosted: 17:28 - 08 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is at our house, the pathway into a small courtyard/dining/tool store/motorbike parking Rolling Eyes

We are on the lookout for a building nearby to use as a workshop/storage and to keep the motorbikes in. It’s a small village with numerous unused buildings. The challenge with such places is finding the owner! Laughing

Still, Sid manages pretty well considering
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chickenstrip
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PostPosted: 18:14 - 08 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tracey Suntan-King wrote:


Still, Sid manages pretty well considering


Admirably I'd say, all things considered!
Sid, can you knock me up a thin-line Telecaster please, ta Very Happy
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Easy-X
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PostPosted: 20:22 - 08 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

Short-scale is it?! I'll give you short-scale!

https://i.imgur.com/9qiopu1.jpg?1

Something I found in the cupboard the other day! It's a solid-body concert Uke that originally had a standard, under bridge piezo pickup. I carved out some cavities for pickups and added metal strings.

The failure at the time was the intonation so I gave up. Many moons have passed since then and metal "guitar style" bridges are now available so I've got one on order and this shall be resurrected in the coming weeks Smile
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MCN
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PostPosted: 23:55 - 08 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tracey Suntan-King wrote:
This is at our house, the pathway into a small courtyard/dining/tool store/motorbike parking Rolling Eyes

We are on the lookout for a building nearby to use as a workshop/storage and to keep the motorbikes in. It’s a small village with numerous unused buildings. The challenge with such places is finding the owner! Laughing

Still, Sid manages pretty well considering


Did yous dig up a 12th century crusader to get that headstone?
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Tracey Suntan-King
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PostPosted: 07:19 - 09 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

^^That stone is a bit of a mystery. It's very ancient. It came with the house, but we do know how it got here. We just hope the authorities don't find out Shifty


Cool though innit Very Happy

Edit: It wasn't nicked from anywhere, it was at another private house, it just probably should not have been moved because it's so old.
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Islander
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PostPosted: 09:35 - 09 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

Suntan Sid wrote:

The hardest thing, AFAIC, is achieving the accuracy required.
If you're building a set of shelves a few mm out isn't going to make a lot of difference. However with a guitar your margin for error is probably around +/- 0.25mm, so constant measuring before any cutting or shaping.
If you can achieve the accuracy required everything else falls in to place relatively easily.

I find making the neck the most rewarding!

The most challenging thing for me has been, in my current location, I have no workshop, no bench in fact there isn't a flat surface in the whole property. I also have no large machines, I do have access to a bandsaw, which is great, the same friend also has a jointer, I did use it once and decided I could get a better result with a hand plane.

The other thing, at the moment, is getting hold of wood, the SG is made out of some old garden furniture,(iroko), and a sheesham wood CD rack. I was lucky enough to get a big piece of mahogan for the neck.

The bass template is made out of some old deck chairs someone had chucked out, I think it's birch.
I really need some maple for the bass neck, which might be difficult to find.


Iroko is a bugger to work with but really rewarding when it all goes well Smile I assume that's a Crimson stain you've used - they really do make the grain pop don't they?

Did you use a standard Gibson neck design or did you carve a volute into it to mitigate the standard weak point? Did you use the faceting method to carve and if you did, how did you find it?

Given the lack of tools and workspace that's an impressive (and lovely) piece of workmanship. Thumbs Up
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Islander
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PostPosted: 09:37 - 09 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tracey Suntan-King wrote:
^^That stone is a bit of a mystery. It's very ancient. It came with the house, but we do know how it got here. We just hope the authorities don't find out Shifty


Cool though innit Very Happy

Edit: It wasn't nicked from anywhere, it was at another private house, it just probably should not have been moved because it's so old.


That's a stunning thing to have. I love old grave markers - there are some stunners in St Magnus Cathedral up here. Smile
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Suntan Sid
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PostPosted: 12:55 - 09 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

Islander wrote:


Iroko is a bugger to work with but really rewarding when it all goes well Smile I assume that's a Crimson stain you've used - they really do make the grain pop don't they?

Did you use a standard Gibson neck design or did you carve a volute into it to mitigate the standard weak point? Did you use the faceting method to carve and if you did, how did you find it?

Given the lack of tools and workspace that's an impressive (and lovely) piece of workmanship. Thumbs Up


I didn't find the iroko too challenging, it is hard but planes nicely if you've got a good edge on the blade. I managed to get a second hand Stanley 5 1/2 with a spare "Samurai" blade, which helped!
I believe some people can get an allergic reaction to iroko, I didn't.

I made a totally non Gibson neck, in that it's laminated from two, grain opposed, pieces of mahogany, from the same 2 x 8. I have carved in a volute, I've also opted for the dual action truss rod as opposed to the Gibson type.
Yes, I used the faceting method, I've used in the past, I don't however carve in the profile at both ends and join them up. I mark up the first set of facets and carve to the lines, I mark in the second set of facets and carve to those line, after that I go with what looks and feels right. I find the process relatively easy, The first neck I did I used a 1/2" chisel to carve the lot, this time I did it with wood rasps.

Regarding the Stain, I have used Crimson stains before, unfortunately due to postal problems here it's not worth the hassle. I have ended up using some water based leather dye, although it is more like paint and doesn't really penetrate the wood. I have tested it and it will take a lacquer finish, so once I'm happy with the look I'll go with it.
I did order some aniline dye powder, it took three months to get here, I was not pleased! Anyway I tried mixing it with every solvent you can think of and I could not get it to dissolve, which is why I've ended up with the leather dye/paint.
I'm going to do some further experiments with food colouring, to dye the wood. Despite what various woodworking forums like to say I had some decent results, a piece I stained and lacquered a few months ago has not deteriorated in anyway.

Neck:-

https://i.imgur.com/690E7qh.jpeg

https://i.imgur.com/M3xQU3l.jpeg

Non distorted images here:

https://imgur.com/gallery/r9ukvOb
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Islander
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PostPosted: 18:01 - 09 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

That neck is lovely! Much better than the weaker Gibson design.

Careful with Aniline dyes, they're toxic - gloves and P3 mask advised. They normally come in either alcohol soluble or water soluble (hot water) although I have heard of some needing a petroleum distillate. They're also not always durable - you might actually be better off with the leather dye. It's produced a lovely result anyway.

Food colours should work just fine - I used to use them for hand colouring photographs years ago and never had an issue with deterioration. I can't imagine wood being that much of a problem.

Looking forward to seeing the finished guitar - it's going to be great Thumbs Up
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Suntan Sid
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PostPosted: 21:20 - 09 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

RE, aniline dye, I tried dissolving in the following, pure alcohol, acetone, lacquer thinners, nitro cellulose thinners, warm tap water, warm deionised water, none of them worked. The powder couldn't break the surface tension of the water, the other solvents all looked promising to start with, however after an hour they would separate out, powder on the bottom and clear liquid above.
I think both myself and the reseller have both been taken for a ride, I have no idea what the powder, I was supplied with, is. According to the blurb on the website it should have dissolved in any of the solvents I used.

A couple of other things regarding the guitar, the body is basically a sandwich of sheesham on the top, iroko in the middle and sheesham on the back. Before gluing the sandwich together it was obvious that the iroko was, significantly, increasing the weight, I also made the body 5mm thicker than a standard SG, 40mm rather than 35mm, which obviously didn't help, so i made the decision to to chamber the body. Including the control cavity there are are 4 chambers, two in the upper bout and two in the lower. Using a sandwich also meant that I could cut out channels in the iroko for the wiring which means I don't need a pick guard to hide it all. I'm partial to a bit of harmonic feedback! Laughing

You may have spotted at the bottom of the neck there are two pieces of contrasting wood. I cut the tenon down by the 10mm and glued on the sheesham so it matches the body. When the neck is glued in and I get the tenon down to the same level as the top, it means I wont have to use the tiny pick guard SG's have between the neck and the neck pickup.
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Islander
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PostPosted: 23:54 - 09 Apr 2021    Post subject: Reply with quote

Suntan Sid wrote:
RE, aniline dye, I tried dissolving in the following, pure alcohol, acetone, lacquer thinners, nitro cellulose thinners, warm tap water, warm deionised water, none of them worked. The powder couldn't break the surface tension of the water, the other solvents all looked promising to start with, however after an hour they would separate out, powder on the bottom and clear liquid above.
I think both myself and the reseller have both been taken for a ride, I have no idea what the powder, I was supplied with, is. According to the blurb on the website it should have dissolved in any of the solvents I used.


How bizarre to rip you (and the reseller) off over something like that! You've certainly exhausted the possibilities for a suitable solvent.

Suntan Sid wrote:
A couple of other things regarding the guitar, the body is basically a sandwich of sheesham on the top, iroko in the middle and sheesham on the back. Before gluing the sandwich together it was obvious that the iroko was, significantly, increasing the weight, I also made the body 5mm thicker than a standard SG, 40mm rather than 35mm, which obviously didn't help, so i made the decision to to chamber the body. Including the control cavity there are are 4 chambers, two in the upper bout and two in the lower. Using a sandwich also meant that I could cut out channels in the iroko for the wiring which means I don't need a pick guard to hide it all. I'm partial to a bit of harmonic feedback! Laughing


Well the partially hollow bodied approach worked for Brian May...

I'm not a huge fan of pick guards - I haven't seen many that actually complement the appearance of an instrument. If it makes wiring easier then score!

Suntan Sid wrote:
You may have spotted at the bottom of the neck there are two pieces of contrasting wood. I cut the tenon down by the 10mm and glued on the sheesham so it matches the body. When the neck is glued in and I get the tenon down to the same level as the top, it means I wont have to use the tiny pick guard SG's have between the neck and the neck pickup.


I did spot that. I wasn't sure why that was other than that it was a laminated neck and possibly differences in the two pieces. That's an elegant solution to matching the neck and body. Smile
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